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Oregon’s state forests are the focal points of protests and lawsuits this summer. The culminating action of the Earth First! Cascadia Bioregional Rendezvous on June 25 was a lockdown at the state Capitol protesting the increased logging and clearcuts on Oregon’s state lands.

The last four days of the Olympic Trials for Track & Field at UO’s Hayward Field run Thursday through Sunday, June 28-July 1, and the full schedule of events can be found at www.tracktown12.com

Here is some basic information for those who do not have convenient internet access.

• A campaign to raise money for the Eugene Sunday Streets program kicks off at the free monthly Breakfast at the Bike Bridges from 7 to 9 am Friday, June 29, at 24th & Amazon. More information at bikelane.proboards.com

• A panel discussion “On Track: The Rise of Women’s Sports” will be at City Club of Eugene at 11:50 am Friday, June 29, at the Downtown Athletic Club, 10th and Willamette. Panelists include Beck Sisley, Ellen Devlin-Schmidt and Quenna Beasley.

Every little bit counts. At least, that’s the way the folks at Project REconomy see it when it comes to foreclosure. The Oregon-based organization is holding a rally from 4 to 7 pm Sunday, June 24, at Reality Kitchen, 245 Van Buren, to “celebrate, affirm and tell the stories of victories” against the foreclosure machine, says Communications Director Michelle Glass.

The 38th annual Black Sheep Gathering is happening June 22-24 at the Lane Events Center, a “sheep to shawl” event that has grown to be recognized as one of the best of its kind in America. The BSG will have animal, wool, mohair and fiber arts competitions as well as a trade show and classes taught by renowned instructors. All events, except the classes being taught at O’Hara grade school, are free to the public.

Horses were roped by the legs, dragged by the neck and thrown to the ground in a practice called horse tripping at a recent rodeo in Jordan Valley, Ore., and one bucking horse broke its leg. A graphic video of the events from the May 19-20 Big Loop Rodeo was posted on YouTube by the animal advocacy group SHowing Animals Respect & Kindness (SHARK). 

• ODOT is spraying highways in the Eugene-Springfield area. For more information call 1-888-996-8080.

• Seneca Jones Timber Company, 689-1011, plans to ground spray approximately 3 miles of roads near Fish Creek with Milestone VM, Glyphosate and Triclopyr with additives Methylated Seed Oil and Syl-Tac. See ODF notice 2012-781-00386. 

Eugene is not only TrackTown USA, according to a press release from the Eugene Police Department, while the Olympic Trials are under way, it’s also a Mecca for thieves. The Trials will bring top-tier athletes, tourists, music, good times and, the EPD says, an increase in crime.

Lane County has been criticized for its lack of transparency, and a June meeting of the county’s Policies and Procedures Committee included a discussion of making it even more costly for the public and media to gain access to public records.

Top City Frozen Yogurt Café is finally opening for business at 5 pm Friday, June 22, after numerous delays. The shop, which originally planned to open in March, is located at 1665 W. 18th Ave., sharing a parking lot with Albertsons. The building was previously Bene Pizza and before that a branch of Oregon Community Credit Union. Top City is owned by Joel and Tina Rimmer of Eugene and Tina will be managing the café. The Rimmer family business is Oldfield’s Appliance and Home Theater.

In Afghanistan

• 2,004 U.S. troops killed* (1,997)

• 16,368 U.S. troops wounded in action (16,277)

• 1,131 U.S. contractors killed (1,131)

• 12,793 civilians killed (12,793)

• $539.1 billion cost of war ($537 billion)

• $159.2 million cost to Eugene taxpayers ($158.6 million)


In Iraq

A free dental clinic for extractions only is coming up Saturday, June 23, for people who are uninsured, low income, have a tooth that needs to be removed, and have not had recent dental care. Patients need to have a phone number where they can be reached to confirm appointments.

The event is being organized by the Occupy Eugene Medical Clinic in cooperation with St. Vincent de Paul. Dentists can work on only one quadrant at a time so only one upper or lower jaw, left or right side, can be treated at this clinic. A limit of 20 people can be treated.

The giant multi-national food company, Nestlé, has its eye on Cascade Locks, a small town east of Portland, for its first water-bottling plant in the Pacific Northwest. But environmental watchdog groups and locals are having none of it. 

Noted scientist, public speaker and professor Dr. Richard Jackson will be visiting cities throughout Oregon this summer to address the relationship between human health and the environmental conditions we’ve created in our cities and suburbs. Jackson’s first stop in the 2012 Healthy Communities Speaker Series is Eugene’s downtown Public Library Tuesday, June 19. A reception with the speaker begins at 5 pm, followed by a lecture and discussion from 5:45 to 7 pm.

What image comes to mind when you hear the words “global warming”? Ice shelves crashing? Shrinking glaciers? Polar bears stranded on floating ice chunks? 

The Winnemem Wintu tribe of Northern California has tried for years to perform their traditional coming of age ceremony in peace on the McCloud River, but they are often met with drunken boaters who shout and disregard the location’s sanctity. This year Eugene’s Civil Liberties Defense Center (CLDC) is trying to help.

 GreenLane, a local business networking group, is partnering with Ninkasi Brewing for a “People, Profit & Pints” summer gathering from 5 to 7 pm Thursday, June 14, at Ninkasi, 272 Van Buren in the Whiteaker neighborhood. The event is for members and people looking at joining the group. Find GreenLane on Facebook.

“I had a 2-year-old son, and I was concerned. I became one of those parents who worries about these vaccinations.”

Catherine Clinton, a local naturopathic doctor, is just one of countless parents who’ve experienced misgivings related to the risks associated with vaccinations — and with forgoing those vaccinations — particularly in regard to immunizing infants and children against preventable diseases.

You may find yourself riding down the streets of Eugene for a cause this weekend. And you may be completely in the nude. Eugene’s annual World Naked Bike Ride (WNBR), a mass protest of cyclists against oil dependency, initiated in 2006, is upon us again. 

The International Day of Solidarity with Eco-Prisoners is June 11, and in Eugene the event will be marked with a circus of sorts at the Wayne Morse U.S. Courthouse. Last year the day was celebrated in 30 cities around the world, according to Eugene’s Civil Liberties Defense Center. Organizers say there will be jugglers, fire-breathers, stilts, music, clowns and other performers.

Is arranging an emergency meeting through serial emails and phone calls a violation of the open meetings law under the ruling by Judge Michael Gillespie? Recently released emails show the Lane County Commission’s conservative majority decided to have a meeting to vote on an issue with less than 24 hours’ notice. They did not contact progressive Commissioners Pete Sorenson and Rob Handy until less than an hour’ and half before the 9 am meeting on May 3. 

• ODOT has sprayed the following highways in the Eugene-Springfield area in the last two weeks: Belt Line, 99, I-5, 126, I-105. Other highways may be sprayed. For more information call (888) 996-8080.

• Rosboro LLC, (541) 746-8411, plans to spray Garlon 4 and glyphosate on 500 acres of roadsides near the McKenzie River and the following tributaries: Doris Creek, Ennis Creek, Quartz Creek and Sugar Creek. See ODF notice 2012-771-00433.

Lane County’s budget misery has only just begun. The county’s budget committee approved the proposed budget in May, and the cuts kick in at the beginning of the fiscal year, July 1, with cuts already taking place.

Though much of the media furor has been over issues such as cuts to the jail and the sheriff’s office, the cuts are hitting the public services designed to keep people out of jail and healthy just as hard. And local AFSCME union representative Jim Steiner says some of the cuts may cost more money than they save.