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Oregon Department of Transportation is spraying roadsides. Call 503-986-3010 to talk with a vegetation management coordinator or call 1-888-996-8080 for recent herbicide application information. Hwys. I-5, 99 and 126 were recently sprayed.

M Three Timber Company, 767-3785, plans to hire Western Helicopter Services, 503-538-9469, to aerially spray 36 acres and 30.1 acres near Muslin Creek West of Lynx Hollow with 2,4-D, clopyralid, hexazinone, sulfometuron methyl, atrazine and/or Induce. See ODF notification 2016-781-01311, call Brian Peterson at 541-935-2283 with questions.

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) assessed a civil penalty of $6,600 against Maryland-based W.R. Grace & Co. – Conn. on April 6 for illegally transporting thousands of pounds of hazardous waste from a Portland warehouse to a Grace manufacturing facility in Albany in May of last year.

• Warren Weisman of Eugene-based renewable energy start-up Hestia Home Biogas tells us the home biogas digester manufacturer has been invited to audition for the hit TV show ABC’s Shark Tank. Hestia’s biodigester tanks, which convert compost into “clean-burning renewable energy,” are manufactured in Vancouver, Washington, and metal work is fabricated in Eugene by Chandler Metal Works.

Can coasters that test for date rape drugs help solve the University of Oregon’s sexual assault problem? Or are they a drop in the bucket of a larger institutional issue? 

The Courtside and Skybox apartments teamed up with local medical supply company Med-Tech Resource to provide current and potential residents with coasters that test for the date rape drugs ketamine and gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB).

On Sunday, April 10, dozens of people came to Kesey Square in downtown Eugene to memorialize a vibrant former member of the Eugene community with Cascadian flags, pine cones and other symbols of his years in activism, civic engagement, advocating for diversity and more.

There are many reasons to read Eugene author Melissa Hart’s new young adult fiction book, Avenging the Owl, but the multiple references to Eugene life and Oregon culture are chief among them for local readers.

Tsunami Books will host a book launch for Hart on April 17, with readings from the winners of her middle-school nature essay contest.

A weekly produce box from a local farm can cost a family of four $550 — for a 20-week supply of healthy food, it’s a real bargain. But it’s not something every family can afford.

On April 14, First United Methodist Church hosts That’s My Farmer, an annual fundraiser to support low-income families by providing access to local and organic food through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs. Donations will go towards That’s My Farmer’s low-income fund, which subsidizes what families cannot afford to pay for a season of food shares.

Oregon Department of Transportation is spraying roadsides. Call 503-986-3010 to talk with a Vegetation Management Coordinator or call 1-888-996-8080 for recent herbicide application information. Highways I-5, 99, 101 and 126 East were recently sprayed.

• Lane Community College will hold its 26th Annual Job Fair on Thursday, April 21, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Center for Meeting and Learning, Building 19, main campus, 4000 E. 30th Avenue, Eugene. This is a free event open to the public. Career and Employment Specialist Tina Hunter recommends that people come dressed as they would for a job interview, bring a resume and prepare a pitch. Participants can enter to win door prizes, including $100 gift certificates for classes and gift cards to the LCC Titan Store.

• The NAACP of Lane County’s “Community Conversations: Building Unity in our Community” series of public meetings on race, privilege and equity continues from 5:30 to 8 pm Thursday, April 14, at the EWEB Community Room, North Building, 500 E. 4th Ave. The meeting begins with a light dinner at 5:30. Additional meetings in the series will be at the same time and place on the second Thursday of each month through May. Reservations are requested through naacplanecounty.org or the Facebook page. Call 682-5619.

This issue begins a new era in Eugene Weekly newsroom management as I turn over the editor’s desk to my able colleague Camilla Mortensen. It should be a smooth transition. Camilla has been on staff since March 2007 and knows the community and region well. She has been invaluable as reporter, news editor and associate editor while writing award-winning investigative stories that have made EW one of the leading environmental voices in the Northwest. She has unique qualifications — a Ph.D. in comparative literature and folklore, an inquiring mind, strength of character, organizational chops, a sharp sense of humor — qualities that will help carry this paper on to the next level.

Lane County is considering changes to its longtime ban on spraying roadsides with chemicals. 

The Lane County Vegetation Task Force proposes changing from the current “Roadside Vegetation Management and Last Resort Herbicide Use Policy” to the “Roadside Integrated Vegetation Management Plan” that takes into account using a limited amount of chemicals to control vegetation.

Oregon Department of Transportation is spraying roadsides. Call (503) 986-3010 to talk with a vegetation management coordinator or call 1-888-996-8080 for recent herbicide application information. Highways I-5, 99, 101 and 126 East were recently sprayed. We received faxed notification of upcoming spray on Hwy. 36 beginning April 14.

In the aftermath of the Arizona primary election fiasco, with voters waiting in long lines and ballots getting thrown out, Lane County voters are wondering how they can make sure their ballots get counted.

Concerned area residents have contacted EW saying their voter affiliation is incorrect and that they had registered as Democrats but recently received a notice from the Oregon Secretary of State Elections Division saying they were unaffiliated.

On April 16, the Portland-based Women’s Foundation of Oregon will arrive in Eugene to listen to local women and girls as part of a statewide tour. The “Listen to Her” tour gives women all around Oregon a chance to share their concerns about pressing issues that affect their lives, including pay equity and living wage jobs, childcare and domestic violence. 

The stories shared on April 16 will be recorded, with permission from participants, and outlined in a Women’s Foundation of Oregon report that will name issues important to female Oregonians. 

 • Café Soriah at 384 W. 13th Ave. has expanded into the former dress shop next door, adding another dining room with 40 more seats. Owner Ib Hamide tells us Soriah plans to open for lunch Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays starting April 13,  from 11:30 am to 2 pm. The lunch menu will bring back much of what  Hamide served at Casablanca when it was in the 5th Street Public Market, he says, including falafel, shawarma, tabbouleh, hummus “as well as a few interesting and popular additions to complement the Mediterranean menu.” 

• A discussion on “Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon? A Hidden History Conversation Project” will be from 6:30 to 8:30 pm Friday, April 8, at the Cottage Grove Community Center, 700 E. Gibbs Ave. Speakers include PSU adjunct professor and author Walidah Imarisha. Sponsored by Cottage Grove Blackberry Pie Society, the Cottage Grove Library, the Rural Organizing Project and Oregon Humanities. Email blackberrypie@gmail.com for more information.

 • Saturday Market and Farmers Market will open their seasons Saturday, April 2, at the Park Blocks downtown. This hub of community activity will feature artisans, chefs, musicians and community members gathering to celebrate art, life and veggies in the southern Willamette Valley. Saturday Market will be open 33 Saturdays, more than 400 artisans will sell more than $1.5 million worth of handcrafted wares, nearly 500 local musicians will play on the stage and around the market, and 15 food booths will draw hungry crowds.

• The Cottage Grove Blackberry Pie Society will host Lane County Sheriff Byron Trapp and Cottage Grove Interim Police Chief Scott Shepherd from 6:30 to 8 pm Thursday, March 31, in the Reception Room at the Cottage Grove Community Center, 700 E. Gibbs, Cottage Grove. Free and open to the public. Email blackberrypie@gmail.com for more information. 

“Millions of unwanted animals are euthanized every year in this country” as the result of pet overpopulation, says Misha English, a board member for Stop Pet Overpopulation Today (SPOT). Since 1997, SPOT has provided spay and neuter financial assistance for low and no income Lane County residents. 

On April 9, Amazon Park Animal Clinic will present SPOT’s Roaring ’20s Casino Night and Silent Auction at The Shedd.

• ODOT will soon be spraying roadsides. Call Jim Gamble at ODOT District 5 at 744-8080 or call (888) 996-8080 for herbicide application information. Hwy. 101 north of Dunes City and Florence was recently sprayed. 

• Rosboro LLC, 736-2100, plans to spray their roadsides in Lane County with triclopyr, aminopyralid, glyphosate, metsulfuron methyl, Dyne-Amic, Induce, Syl-Tac and/or R-11, See ODF notification 2016-781-03793, call Dan Menk at 935-2283 with questions.

$1.2 million. That’s how much money Oregon won’t receive this year from two federal agencies due to its failure to protect water quality from logging in coastal watersheds.

According to Nina Bell of Northwest Environmental Advocates, “the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have said for 18 years that Oregon’s logging practices create dangerous levels of water pollution and harm fish.” 

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) assessed a civil penalty of $6,400 against BJB Milling & Lumber, LLC on March 22 for BJB’s failure to follow through on a commitment to construct a bioswale to address elevated levels of total suspended solids (TSS) in stormwater discharged from its Eugene facility. BJB identified an alternative means of addressing TSS levels toward the end of last year. BJB’s Eugene facility is located at 101 Iowa Street, and BJB is owned by Jolly Investments, LLC (which is operated by Springfield accountant James Youel).