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Frogs really don’t stay in a pot of slowly boiling water and die. Given a chance to jump out, they will. That anecdote has been used endlessly to describe people who simply don’t react to negative changes if they happen gradually. And it would be a useful one to describe Oregonians and our changing climate … if it were true. 

In 1994, when astronomer Carl Sagan called our home planet a “pale blue dot,” he described the essence of our fragility. Viewed from Voyager 1, millions of miles away, our entire existence is reduced to a single speck. 

The date 4/20 might mean weed day across the world, but as of July 1, every day will be weed day in Oregon. Given the long history of the association with 420 and weed, it’s doubtful that 7/1 will take over as a code for “Let’s go light up.” 

But thanks to Measure 91, if you are over 21 and you partake (privately) on 4/20 next year, you will be doing so legally. For this year, if you don’t have a medical marijuana card, there are other activities you can legally engage in.

• ODOT is currently spraying roadsides. Call Tony Kilmer at ODOT District 5 at 744-8080 or call 1-888-996-8080 for herbicide application information. Hwys. 58, 99 near Cottage Grove, 105 and 126 in Springfield and Beltline were sprayed recently.

• Walton Hylomorphia, 343-4167, plans to spot spray 179.1 acres abutting Stagecoach Road near the Siuslaw with glyphosate, imazapyr, triclopyr with acid, W.E.B. Oil and/or AD-Wet 90 CA. See ODF notification 2015-781-05877, call Robin Biesecker at 935-2283 or Jim Hall at 997-8713 with questions.

Bills regulating how third-party firms disburse financial aid to Oregon students got stalled during the last legislative session. Reps. Nancy Nathanson (D-Eugene) and Paul Holvey (D-Eugene) are working on several bills to make sure students are getting the best and fairest deals.

Nobel Peace Prize recipient Rigoberta Menchú’s 1983 memoir, I Rigoberta Menchú, opened the eyes of the world to the atrocities committed against the indigenous Mayan population of Guatemala at the hands of its U.S.-backed right-wing government.

 The prolonged civil war ended in 1996, but Menchú’s efforts to spread peace have not, and she is coming to Eugene for the 2015 PeaceJam Northwest Conference, a program that connects Nobel Peace Prize winners with teenagers.

The Hammered Lamb, a new pub and nightclub dedicated to the queer community, is slated to open this summer at 150 W. Broadway. The space has been vacant for two years and last housed the Lord Leebrick Theatre Company administrative office and HIV Alliance.

What is there about Kesey Square that needs fixing? It depends on whom you ask. Even the little bird sitting on Ken Kesey’s shoulder knows that there has long been a desire by those concerned with the need to improve the pedestrian and shopping experience downtown to fill up the space with a new building. Theirs is a defensive point of view. They see the square’s present clientele as a public nuisance that seriously detracts from their shopping mall ideal. Filling in the square would move that problem to somewhere else.

• No surprise that the timber industry in Oregon still has enough lobbying power to stifle the Democratic Legislature when it comes to even minor new rules on aerial spraying of pesticides on private timberlands. The timber industry has a strong ally in Oregonians for Food and Shelter, which represents big chemical manufacturers and distributors. What can we do other than hold our lawmakers’ feet to the fire? Well, when the Legislature fails to make reforms, the people can rise up.

KEPW Eugene Home Grown Community Radio is holding weekly meetings at 6 pm Thursdays at the Growers Market upstairs, 454 Willamette St. The group has raised about $2,500 of the $10,000-plus needed to get the low-power radio station up and running by late summer. Organizers plan to broadcast local musicians and bands, variety shows, progressive call-in talk shows, environmental news, labor news and more. See enfn.org/~eugpeace or look for KEPW on Facebook. 

• A panel discussion about the pending Pacific Connector Pipeline and Jordan Cove LNG Export Terminal will be from 6:30 to 8 pm Thursday, April 16, at the First United Methodist Church, 1376 Olive St. Panelists include Jody McCaffree, executive director of Citizens Against LNG, Stacey McLaughlin, a southern Oregon landowner facing eminent domain, and Ted Gleichman from the Sierra Club. See world350.org/Eugene for more information.

In Afghanistan

• 2,356 U.S. troops killed (2,356 last month)

• 20,068 U.S. troops wounded in action (20,067)

• 1,592 U.S. contractors killed (1,582)

• 16,179 civilians killed (updates NA)

• $755.5 billion cost of war ($792.7 billion)

• $317.7 million cost to Eugene taxpayers ($317.1 million)

 

Against ISIS

• $2.3 billion cost of military action ($2.1 billion)

• $933,300 cost to Eugene taxpayers ($849,200)

“My parents started an arts co-op in Boulder in the 1970s,” says Colorado native Mitra Chester, who studied anthropology and religion at University of Colorado Boulder, then moved to Austin, Texas, and got married. She worked in clothing resale and began to design clothes. She and her husband, Aaron, did some research, chose Eugene for its cool climate and cool people and moved here in 2003. They ran two boutique resale stores, Deluxe and Kitsch, and she put on a yearly local fashion show beginning in 2007.

Carol Deppe knows we want tomatoes. “And you want them earlier,” she says, “and you want the most delicious varieties, and you want different kinds and colors.” Deppe, who lives in Corvallis, is a plant breeder, farmer and author. Her book The Resilient Gardener, published in 2010, catapulted her to prominence as an events speaker.

“Hey Ho! Let’s Go!” The classic battle cry will inevitably reach the rafters this Sunday as Richie Ramone, one of the last remaining member of classic punk-rock act The Ramones, brings his leather-clad gospel anew to Eugene. 

“Still a real world here,” sings Joanne Rand on the track “Real World” from her 2014 album Still a Real World. The song is a manifesto of sorts, cajoling us to disconnect from our networked lives and refocus on the material world. 

With his always-vacant bug eyes, gap-toothed perma-grin and just-rolled-out-of-bed demeanor, Canadian musician Mac DeMarco is indie rock’s greatest goofus. 

The Oregon Ducks softball team has earned the right to call its squad the best in the nation, even if that title ebbs and flows ever so slightly.

Whatcha doing on Tuesday, April 28? I’ll pause here for however many thumb taps, finger swipes or page flicks it takes to check your calendar. Nothing? No idea what’s happening that date? Any guesses?

Theater has long served as fertile ground for new ideas to germinate, with playwrights boldly questioning the status quo and planting the seeds of change.

Sara is unlucky. She has a problem with light bulbs blowing out, leftovers spontaneously combusting and goldfish going belly up before their time.

With a large, skilled cast and an indefinable but undeniable energy, the reaction to New Hope Christian College’s Hairspray was: Wow. “This is one of the best musicals I’ve seen in Eugene,” an audience member gushed at intermission. 

STOP THE PIPELINE

Holy crap, a pipeline in Oregon! At last, a climate hero boldly speaking up to protect Oregonians' air, water, land rights and economy! Thank you, Rep. Peter Buckley from Ashland! Telling the truth and boldly facing reality is so very unpopular in the political world. So far, no other Oregonian elected has joined citizens opposing the fracked gas export projects two Canadian companies are trying to force into Oregon. 

I consider myself a straight guy—but for the last four years, I’ve been having an affair with “Connie,” a trans girl I met online. It was just casual at first, but over time we developed a deeper personal relationship but kept it hidden. At some point, I figured out she was in love with me. I love her too, but I don’t think I am “in love” with her. Several weeks ago, I went on a couple of dates with a girl I met on Match.com.