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• What happened in the Portland courtroom that caused the jury to acquit Ammon and Ryan Bundy and their accomplices in the 41-day armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon? One theory is that the prosecution aimed too high with the charges. Another is that Judge Anna Brown should have removed two jurors instead of one when she received a complaint of bias, although that may not have affected the outcome.

•  After eight years at its spot on Willamette Street downtown, secondhand shop and costume mecca Kitsch-22 will close in November. The Kitsch-22 team tells EW that the space it has leased at 1022 Willamette is too small for the way the business has expanded, while it would “cost too much money to move somewhere else.” So owner Norman Lent has decided to close up shop and retire.

Don’t miss the Trauma Healing Project’s 3rd Annual Glow Variety Show at 7 pm Nov. 19 and 2 pm Nov. 20 at the Hult Center. This multicultural extravaganza features music, dance and acrobatics, with proceeds supporting healing arts for survivors of trauma; $28-$31.75. 

• International Association for the Advancement of Creative Maladjustment says it hosts a “little peaceful Speak Out Against Psychiatric Dosing” event in Kesey Square 1:30 pm Friday, Nov. 4. Organizer David Oaks says, “After speakers and an open mic, we will march together to the office of Rep. Pete DeFazio, to object to his co-sponsorship of a bill that would increase outpatient coercion in mental health.” Free.

What’s your “social imaginary”? In other words, as the Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor defines it in his 2007 work Modern Social Imaginaries, how do you imagine your social existence, how do you fit together with others — including the natural environment, I would add — and how do you imagine things going on between you and others, the expectations normally met and the deeper ethical ideas and images that underpin those expectations?

For the past century, Planned Parenthood has transformed sexual and reproductive health and empowered millions of people worldwide to make informed health decisions — forever changing the way they live, love, learn and work. To commemorate our centennial, we are kicking off #100YearsStrong, a yearlong effort of acting, sharing and celebrating the progress Planned Parenthood has championed for women and families over the past 100 years.

Eugene-Portland punk band Dirtclodfight has an impressive pedigree stretching back to SoCal in the late ’80s, including stints with well-known record labels Flipside and Cavity Search. 

The Jackson-Hole-by-way-of-New-York indie-acoustic soul outfit Benyaro, featuring Ben Musser and Leif Routman, has been through Eugene several times before, but this time the duo is rolling through on its “Get Out the Vote” tour — partnering with Rock the Vote and HeadCount organizations — even if that means performing a day after the election, Nov. 9, with Idaho’s country-rock heartbreaker Jeff Crosby at the post-election party at Axe & Fiddle in Cottage Grove; free.

Following the demise of the late, lamented G.L.O.S.S., New York duo PWR BTTM is a strong contender for the title of most visible — and thus most important — queer punk band in America. Mixing rock-duo slop with drunk-Beatles hooks and heart-on-sleeve (but mercifully unaffected) lyrics, this is pop punk that doesn’t sacrifice pop for the punk, or vice versa. Your queer buddies — and some of your straight buddies too — may be bugging you about this band for a long time.  

In very different ways, concerts this month take listeners on a sentimental journey into the past. The Thursday, Nov. 3, concert at The Shedd features Bill Frisell gazing wistfully back at his boomer childhood. The Seattle guitarist and his excellent band (fellow Seattle star violist Eyvind Kang, singer Petra Haden — best known for her work with her late dad, jazz bass legend Charlie Haden — drummer Rudy Royston and bassist Thomas Morgan) play music from the movies (To Kill A Mockingbird, Once Upon A Time In the West, The Godfather, etc.) and TV shows (Bonanza and others). 

Director Michael P. Watkins of Actors Cabaret of Eugene brings a steampunk twist to Richard O’Brien’s cult musical The Rocky Horror Show and, of course, the performance will make you wish you’d donned your fishnets and black lace corset.

VOTE FOR FAHEY

If you live in House District 14, chances are Julie Fahey has knocked on your door. Why? Because by going door to door, she starts a dialogue with the people she will represent and gets to know your concerns and issues. This way she can better represent you when she gets to Salem. Fahey will take her obligation to serve her district seriously. 

She is no late arrival to District 14. She has lived in her district for eight years, with her home in the Churchill area. Information to the contrary is just plain wrong.

I’m a 41-year-old male who looks like the tall, strong, professional, alpha-male type on the outside. On the inside, though, I would like to find a strong, confident woman who wants a cuckolding relationship—she sleeps with other men, while I am faithful and submissive to her. There must be women out there who would love to have a loving, doting boyfriend or husband waiting at home while they go out with other men, but I tend to attract women who want the alpha-male type. What can I do to find—or attract—the kind of woman I’m interested in?

Zoom. There went summer, then autumn. Time flies by, like the wind.

Wind? Nah, too slow. Sometimes I used to ask students how we could calculate the speed of time. The brightest lit up, thinking. Some whipped out their smartphones. An exercise in arithmetic followed: Earth is sorta spherical, about 24,000 around miles at the equator, makes a complete rotation in 24 hours, so the day goes by at 1,000 mph. Wind? Pah: never been a 1,000 mph wind. But that’s not all.

Hunt for the Wilderpeople

On a misty October afternoon, six of us — adults ages 27 to 45 — stand in a strip mall parking lot, high-fiving, wiping sweat from our brows and giggling, rowdy from the silliness and mental acrobatics of the past few hours. We stroll over to nearby Dizzy Dean’s Donuts to reward and replenish ourselves with sticky treats for unraveling an ancient Egyptian mystery and surviving a bloodthirsty zombie attack. 

I mean, come on folks, how much do you accomplish in a workday?

Police in August responded to calls from a South Carolina school saying that scary clowns tried luring some kids into the nearby woods. Around the same time and not far away, goofballs in face paint and fright wigs taunted a little boy outside the apartment complex where he lives.

Law enforcement agencies from Eugene to Florida, and beyond, are fielding panicked calls from traumatized parents who say demented jokers are harassing their little ones.

As a Native American activist testified against a proposed gravel mine in Oakridge at an Oct. 12 Lane County Board of Commissioners meeting, a plainclothes law enforcement officer walked up, took her by the wrists and began placing her arms behind her back. 

Commission Vice Chair Pat Farr, who stopped the officer, later called the incident a learning experience in terms of cultural sensitivity and discrimination.

The University of Oregon Foundation is planning a new building for scientific research, but in the process, its plans may destroy a nearby restaurant, Evergreen Indian Cuisine.

The UO’s newly announced billion-dollar project, the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact, is billing itself as a great opportunity for undergrads to work in labs with professors and post-docs. The project will be funded primarily by a $500 million donation by Phil Knight and matched donor money.

Local writer and filmmaker Henry Weintraub suspects that the horror genre has come to a dead end.

“Modern horror movies don’t really capture me too much,” Weintraub says. “It’s so formulaic. I don’t love a horror movie that’s come out in the last 20 years.”

This, coming from an independent filmmaker whose first full-length feature movie was a zombie flick (Melvin, 2009) followed by a gritty noir thriller (The Darkest Side of Paradise, 2010) and a dark comedy about a wanna-be serial killer (Killing Me, 2012). With these films, promising as they are for such a young talent, Weintraub feels that he’s gone about as far as he can go in a genre that is now dominated by big-budget rehash, like the Saw franchise.

“Sex work is work, sex workers are people and no person is ever more safe when you eliminate their work options,” says Lia, a local activist and sex worker. Lia and fellow sex worker and activist Vera are putting on a rally Oct. 28 in downtown Eugene to “Protest the Raid on Backpage.” 

• In case you have been misled by mainstream media or TV ads to think Dennis Richardson is a reasonable candidate to be Oregon’s secretary of state, heed this message from Rep. Phil Barnhart: “I have known both major party candidates for many years.

On Oct. 28 there will be a free TEDTalk, TEDxVenetaWomen, from 8 am to 2 pm at the Applegate Regional Theater. The free event will include nine live talks by local women, interspersed with previously recorded TEDTalks from TEDWomen 2016, held the previous day in San Francisco, with which it is affiliated, according to Jennifer Chambers, a local organizer for the event.