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I try to get away, but it keeps pulling me back in: Trump. It’s infected everything, this national nightmare. As I flail and floggle about for answers and curatives, it seems that simply everything becomes an abysmally significant metaphor — a parable for incipient fascism, rampant bigotry and the ugly chancre now broiling at the core of the human spirit.

LOVE IS STRONGER

I spent some time today sitting outside the Federal Building in Eugene, Oregon, with a sign saying, “Keep Love Alive” in response to the unrest in America since the election.

One man will never change my values, one man will not change the love in my heart. One man will not stop me from feeling love for my fellow countrymen and women. Whether they are black or white, gay or straight, woman or man.

I’m a very sex-positive girl and I finally convinced my boyfriend to open up about his fetishes. I could tell he was ashamed and torn about sharing them with me, but I’ve been with my fair share of guys and surfed the net for years, and I was convinced nothing would shock me. Well, it turns out he’s into soft vore. I’m not gonna lie, I was a bit put off, but of course I didn’t tell him. I started looking for information about his fetish, and it’s not as uncommon as I thought.

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them was once a slim little book, a for-charity effort pretending to be a Hogwarts textbook. Fantastic Beasts the film (written solely by Harry Potter et al. author J.K. Rowling) bears very little resemblance to that tiny tome, apart from containing many beasts.

Christopher Ward, known as mc chris, is considered the king of nerdcore rap. Filmmaker Kevin Smith once called him the “poet laureate of pop culture” due to his entertainment-inspired lyrics.

On a hot July afternoon, 23-year-old Nicholas Kaasa travels down Broadway in his power wheelchair. The chair is a machine to behold, tank-like, with three gray wheels on each side. It’s outfitted with headlights and red circular taillights, along with orange hazard lights that flash when needed.

With the push of a button, Kaasa can go vertical: A hydraulic seat lift raises him half a foot from the chair’s base. On the left side is attached a black leather, metal-studded saddlebag of the kind more often found on a Harley; it has a Seattle Seahawks logo and silver letters that spell "ICK." “I should probably find that ‘N,’” Kaasa says.

Kaasa — who has cerebral palsy and vision impairment — cannot walk and uses the wheelchair to get around. When I ask him how fast it can go, he responds: “You want to check that?” And then he’s gone, shooting down the sidewalk at warp speed. His answer when I catch up: “Fast.”

After Jan. 20, Inauguration Day, the title “president” is going to appear before the name Donald Trump. 

Beyond the dystopian strangeness of having a reality TV star in the nations’ highest office, in the wake of Trump’s startling Nov. 8 upset of Hillary Clinton in the presidential election, minorities, immigrants, LGBTQ people, environmentalists and more are fearful of what a Trump presidency could mean and are trying to envision a path forward.

A handful of local organizations have come together to help administer the flu vaccine to people experiencing homelessness.

Bruce Tufts, a registered nurse at White Bird Medical Clinic and a volunteer at Egan Warming Center, started a conversation with other volunteers last year about the role they could play in addition to basic medical care.

Native American leader Winona LaDuke says she drove 700 miles to vote this year. 

Now in the wake of Donald Trump’s election, LaDuke — who is executive director of Honor the Earth, an organization whose mission it is to create awareness and support for Native environmental issues — says it’s time to “double down on work in the communities and continue our battles.” 

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) sent the Walmart Supercenters in Eugene and Newport warning letters for hazardous waste law violations on Sept. 29. Both facilities generate between 220 pounds and 2,200 pounds of hazardous waste per month, and the violations were discovered by DEQ during unannounced inspections.

• Spreading a little sunshine for the Earth post presidential election, we were delighted to see U.S. District Court Judge Ann Aiken decide in favor of 21 youth plaintiffs in their constitutional climate lawsuit against the president, federal agencies and the fossil fuel industry. The suit can now move forward in the courts.

The inspiration for the Glow Variety Show, producer Anna Miller says, “came from an initial spark of wanting to create, with nowhere to put it.” 

So three years ago, the choreographer, artistic director, mother and massage therapist got to work. 

As we’re heading towards a holiday for giving thanks, I’m thankful for the varied and interesting dance offerings in our community. 

Maybe you’re the person in your complex or neighborhood to break out the string lights and don your festive turtleneck sweaters the day after Halloween. 

Or perhaps you say “humbug” to the perpetuation of culturally exploitive and corrupt capitalism whilst you cozy up with some anarchist zines and a box of Franzia Blush (or kombucha).

From cuddly kittens to fat joints, there are plenty of wintery activities to help ease the impending gloom of winter. Here are the 12 Days of Euge-mas that you — yes, even you, little nihilist Grinch — can get down with.

Thursday, Nov. 17

The Holiday Night Market, a night of shopping to support local women in small business, fashion, beauty and craft vendors, 5-10pm today, at Venue 252, 252 Lawrence St. FREE.

Friday, Nov. 18

Fern Ridge Holiday Bazaar Weekend, food and crafts by local artisans, 9am-5pm today and Saturday, Nov. 21, 935-8443. FREE. Maps are available in Veneta at City Hall, Ray’s, Veneta-Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce and most bazaar locations.

• The Native American Studies Program at the UO presents “Two Spirits One Hoop” with two spirit/trans* performer and educator Ty Defoe of the Giizhiig, Ojibwe and Oneida Nations 4 pm Friday, Nov. 18, at the UO Many Nations Longhouse, 1630 Columbia Street. Nov. 20 is Transgender Day of Remembrance. 

I can’t think Christmas without a deep chill running up my spine. I smell burning and I forget for a second where I’m standing.

Something bad, way back, deep. But swell things, too.

For Christma-phobes, stepping foot inside the year-round Christmas Treasures gift shop on the winding McKenzie River Highway is liable to send mean pulses of nostalgia through your being, and your heart into convulsive spasms, almost.

I’m pretty weary of the usual holiday fare — the warbling moppets, the repentant codgers, the treacle, the tinsel. And after 2016’s punishing slog? Please. I just can’t. 

So thank goodness Oregon Contemporary Theatre offers plenty of light-hearted laughs this season, with The Santaland Diaries and a visit from America’s favorite Dragapella Beauty Shop Quartet, the Kinsey Sicks.

It may seem strange to suggest that the path to peace is to roll up our sleeves and get our hands dirty regenerating the soil in our gardens and around the world. But this is more than a metaphor suggesting that building peace is like growing a healthy garden. 

The wars we fight, the deplorable state of public health and the surpassing of planetary limits leading to climate change can all be traced back to how we grow our food and view the earth as a resource base to be turned into commodities for consumption.

On Sunday, Nov. 20, from noon-2 pm, Tsunami Books will host a book release celebration for Kristin K. Collier of Eugene, author of the memoir Housewife: Home-remaking in a Transgender Marriage. After high school graduation in Eureka, California, Collier’s planned odyssey to New York to study theater took her only as far as Wyoming, where she met the son of a rancher. They got married and moved to Eugene, where she studied English and he majored in architecture at the UO.

YG might not be a rapper that everyone has heard of, but his politically straightforward message echoed throughout cities across the nation last Tuesday night as results of the presidential election filtered in. The Compton rapper released his single “FDT (Fuck Donald Trump)" back in March — and, in fact, someone drove down 13th Avenue repeatedly playing this during the Trump rally in May — but the catchphrase has remained a whopping battle-cry during this political cycle. 

Liat Lis and Kyle McGonegle — comprising the old-time folk duo — are a reminder that sometimes, musicians are made for each other. Beyond the lush, characteristic two-part vocal harmonies that carve a wake through Lake Toba’s music, there is songwriting and performance talent at work that Eugene has not seen since the string-band heyday of the previous decade. 

Comic book artist, musician and New York native Jeffrey Lewis comes to Eugene behind his 2015 release, the appropriately titled Manhattan. Like a lost Lou Reed album, Manhattan recalls a time when New York was friendlier to artists and freaks. 

Classical music institutions usually reach backward, content to be historical museums of music by long-dead composers. It wasn’t always thus: Composers like Bach and Beethoven would have been appalled to see how today’s orchestras play mostly yesterday’s music. Had that notion prevailed in their time, the music of those great composers wouldn’t have survived. That retro attitude, a product of the early-mid-20th century, has gradually been changing, and Eugene Symphony president Scott Freck wants his band to lead the way.