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NO HUNGRY KIDS

What does it mean when 53 percent of children and youth in Lane County are eligible for free lunch programs (“Summer Safety Net,” June 8)? With one in five children in America living in homes in poverty, this is not just a local problem but a national one.

And the current response from budget proposals by the President and the Speaker of the House is to drastically cut the SNAP (formerly food stamp) program.

I’m almost 30 and I’m a virgin. I’m an overweight, straight-ish guy (I’m attracted to a few men, but those cases are exceedingly rare). I’ve also gone through an absolute hell life thus far, losing a testicle to cancer and having an abusive father who threatened a teenage me into celibacy by invoking the phrase “penile lobotomy” should I have sex with any girlfriends. I’ve barely dated in 10 years, and while I’m free from my father and the aforementioned mortal dick terror, I’m also INCREDIBLY scared about putting myself out there.

Too much has already been said about It Comes at Night, a completely insidious and utterly unsettling new horror film that continues to worm its way under my skin, days after viewing it.

With three recently passed bills, Oregon is cracking down on animal abuse and neglect. The bills, two of which were carried by Eugene senators, touch on everything from animal forfeiture to cock fighting.

It was 50 years ago today — well, more or less — that my generation found itself. 

Rock ’n’ roll turned grand and pretentious that year, 1967, when Sgt. Pepper taught the band to play with a real live symphony orchestra. Here in Eugene, KLCC went on the air for the first time, and the Oregon Country Fair was two years away from being born.

Across the ocean, Vietnam was purring along like a macabre lawnmower.

That was the year of the Summer of Love.

Summer is the high season for Karen Roth, child nutrition programs manager with FOOD for Lane County.

“We have such a need,” Roth says. “Fifty-three percent of Lane County’s children and youth are eligible for the National School Lunch Program.” 

On Monday, May 8, the Eugene Police Department issued a news release asking for the public’s help in identifying a man who walked into the Eugene Islamic Center and “threaten[ed] to kill attendees.” The following day, EPD arrested Chad Everett Russell after a dispute was reported in Monroe Park. 

• About 40 marchers showed up on Friday, June 2, to protest the downtown Eugene dog ban. It’s interesting that the city decided to wait on banning alcohol in all parks due to “mixed” reviews in public comment, but the City Council charged ahead with banning pups, despite decidedly mixed reviews. Were there more people with money and influence wanting to sip wine or toss back a hoppy beer in the park than there were who stroll with their dogs downtown? For the record, we are pro-dog and pro- a responsible drink in the park once in a while.

• The Civil Liberties Defense Center is looking for bilingual people who want to be trained to give Know Your Rights for the Immigrant Community trainings in Lane County. Currently this training is only being given in English, and they are trying to create a group of high quality trainers that can deliver information in English and Spanish that community organizations could use when there is a need. The training is a 6-week commitment, every Thursday evening starting June 15, from 6-9 pm.

Here’s the deal: If you care about your community, you cannot afford to ignore economic development. 

Economic development is not a benign program implemented by well meaning people to create jobs. It is one of the prime game changers that determine the future of a community. We ignore it at our peril.  

Who could have imagined that when Barnum and Bailey closed their tents for good last month in New York that they would ship their leftover elephant effluvia and donkey dung to Oregon’s capitol! Circus Maximus! I say just send ’em all home and save the per diem.

Critically acclaimed songwriter Cory Branan has the stuff of a Nashville country music mega-star: stuff like a twinkle in his eye and a Southern drawl, boyish good looks made rugged by a three-day beard, and a chesty baritone — equally suited for hold-me-close dance numbers as well as arena-ready anthems. 

Country folk band Dear Lemon Trees is more than a balanced collage of solo artists gone trio. Their music is a glass of homemade sun tea on a hot Southern porch, a match made in countryside heaven. 

Mr. Burns: a Post-Electric Play, written by Anne Washburn and directed by Tricia Rodley, imagines an eerie future where firelight provides the only illumination and recounting old episodes of The Simpsons kindles the only warmth. 

BEATING WALDEN

Because of the “genetic Republicans who could not conceive of not voting for a Republican” in Greg Walden’s congressional district (“The Far Side,” May 25), any Democrat who runs against him will be at a disadvantage.

I hate how my boyfriend has sex with me. He is 40 years old. It used to be fine, but a year ago he started adding new moves he obviously got from porn: smacking my pussy with an open palm, vigorously rubbing my clit, wrapping his hands around my neck. I’m not anti-porn; what bothers me is that even though I told him these moves don’t feel good on my body and hurt me, he doesn’t care. I’ve told him that it is painful when he slaps and manhandles my clit, and he responds that he likes it and I should feel happy that he still wants to fuck me six times a week.

In a video, artist Mika Aono tells us she is interested in compulsive behavior. After a short while watching, we get an idea the artist is referring to herself. Aono compulsively collects things other people might throw away, and her new work Spill is composed of pieces greatly inspired by her collections.

Why do superheroes do what they do? It’s a question often answered with a glib oversimplification: It’s the right thing. When you’ve developed a super-suit to save your own ass, it’s the proper thing to use it to stop bad guys. Whether a freak accident gifts you with super-speed, or a spider bites you — same deal. 

Shield your eyes, the great glowing orb (otherwise known as the sun) has returned to Pacific Northwest skies. And in August, that orb will be eclipsed, bringing hordes of tourists to town. Read about the eclipse, beaches, hikes, shows and everything in between in Eugene Weekly's annual guide to all that's summer!

A day with the fishes Discover Willamette Hatchery in Oakridge

The path to totality Watch your eyes when watching the eclipse

Beaches Forever! Why are Oregon Beaches Public, and Where Can You Enjoy One?

2017 Summer Guide Highlights

2017 Summer Guide Calendar

In 2012, journalist John Hockenberry took the TED stage and talked about living life with intent. In his talk, “We Are All Designers,” he recalled his favorite design moment: While he was covering the collapse of Zaire, amid the failure of the banks, looting and bullets flying overhead, someone began shouting at Hockenberry. It was another man in a wheelchair, and he wanted to compare his wheels to Hockenberry’s. 

Years later, Hockenberry installed flashy caster wheels to the front of his wheelchair, which he has used since a car accident when he was 19, and said he wished he could have shown them to the man in Zaire.

Right Here

Events in & around this town of ours.

 

June

 

Thursday, 6/1

Wonderful Ones Storytime for 1-year-olds with their caregivers, Thursdays, 10:15am & 11am, Downtown library, 541-682-8316. FREE.

Fundraiser for Makindu Children’s Program, 15% of all purchases benefit orphaned & vulnerable children of Makindu, Kenya, 11:30am-10pm, Hot Mama’s Wings, 420 W. 13th. FREE.

You can almost listen to the entirety of Taylor Swift’s album 1989 on the way to Oakridge. If you’re the parent of a 7- or 8-year-old — and particularly a girl — you know what this means. For the rest of you, in case you weren’t aware, Oakridge is about 45 minutes southeast of Eugene, past Pleasant Hill and Dexter Reservoir on the way to the mountains.

One of the things that makes Oregon so livable is our miles of unspoiled public beaches. More than a century ago, Oregon Gov. Oswald West engineered the first major protection of public access to the state’s beaches by convincing the 1913 Oregon Legislature to declare all the state’s tidelands to be a state highway. Wait, what? 

More than one of every four people ticketed or arrested by Eugene police for minor crimes last year were homeless or lacked a permanent address, according to Eugene Weekly’s analysis of city court records. 

The court records also reveal that more than one-third of the minor cases involved people who lacked a permanent place to live at some time in the past three years.