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They don’t make them like Harold Pinter anymore, and right now at Lane Community College you can enjoy Pinter’s masterful The Birthday Party, tenderly cooked to a lustrous crackle. This production whizzes by, with direction and performances that fully embrace Pinter’s penchant for the absurd.  

MEN ARE GOOD

Sunday, Nov. 19 is International Men’s Day. Maybe one day during the year we can stop blaming men, particularly white men, for the ills of the world. You might consider a father who daily went to a job he didn’t like so you could live comfortably. You might consider the men who created all the things you take for granted, like houses, roads, schools, hospitals and pretty much everything else. 

Eugene’s art scene is not dead. While the closing of the Jacobs Gallery dealt a blow to art’s accessibility in the city, a group of ambitious volunteers is fighting back with Euzine Comics & Zine Fest 2017 on Nov. 18. 

This is Euzine’s second annual event and artists have jammed up at the door to get into the Broadway Commerce Center to show off their zines — self-published and printed material, from photographs to illustrations.

I was honored to appear with Esther Perel at the Orpheum Theater in Vancouver, BC, a few weeks ago to discuss her new book, The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity. Questions were submitted on cards before the show — some for me, some for Esther, some for both of us — and we got to as many as we could during the event. Here are some of the questions (mostly for me) that we didn’t get to.


An appealing mix of reality and imagination in each of Jon Jay Cruson’s paintings reminds me of a bit from the first days of the TV show Saturday Night Live. Father Guido Sarducci, a character on SNL, suggested that a planet just like ours existed on the other side of the sun. We couldn’t see it, of course — because the sun is in the way — but this other planet was just like ours in every way except that people who lived there ate their corn on the cob north-south (up-down) instead of east-west (across). Though this was the only difference, Father Sarducci didn’t want to go to this other planet because he said he was a creature of habit and eating corn north-south would just be too messy. 

Take just about any film — Casablanca perhaps, or Fast Times at Ridgemont High — utterly drain it of emotion and affect, and you’d end up with something that feels a lot like a film by Yorgos Lanthimos.

In no way is this meant to diminish Lanthimos’ obvious brilliance; in fact, it redounds to his credit that, as with heavies like Kubrick and Lang, the mannered formalism of his style is becoming so identifiable, so chillingly familiar. You could parody the hell out of Lanthimos.

An official document just obtained by Eugene Weekly from the University of Oregon shows that Oregon Bach Festival artistic director Matthew Halls was fired on Aug. 24 while under investigation for alleged discrimination against women and a person of color.

The six-page document was received late in the day Tuesday, Nov. 14, following a public records request EW made in September.

We’re taking a stand. It’s time to impeach Donald Trump.

There are a myriad of reasons to do so: the looming threat of nuclear war with North Korea, the embarrassment of having a “tweeter in chief,” the terrible, amoral example he sets for the children of this nation, the numerous allegations against him of sexual assault and his unwillingness to denounce white supremacists — thus emboldening the worst elements of our country.

But what about Pence?

That’s the question everyone asks when you bring up impeaching President Donald Trump. If Trump were to leave office before the end of his term, Mike Pence would become president — and that would mean a competent ultra-right-winger, possibly also a crook, sitting in the White House in place of the current corrupt fool.

A new law in Oregon takes great steps for protecting the elderly from abuse and mismanagement in the state’s 530-some licensed care facilities.

House Bill 3359, signed by Gov. Kate Brown in August, increases civil penalties for elder abuse by 400 to 500 percent. It also institutes a fine, capped at $1,000, for facilities that fail to report their own abuses. 

Shortly after Donald Trump took office, there was a rash of hot takes by “Resistance” pundits like Keith Olbermann explaining how the majority of the Cabinet could constitutionally remove Trump from office. 

Here’s what section four of the 25th Amendment says: 

Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President.

The only good thing about Donald Trump is that he has made time slow down. As we get older, every year seems to pass more quickly than the last in the rush toward death. But the Trump regime has slowed all of that down and the year since the dark night when he was elected has felt as long as any since high school. 

South Eugene High School senior Noshin Rahman is a reporter for the school’s newspaper, The Axe. Rahman plans to attend college next year and is part of the Career and Technical Education Journalism program. Although undecided about her career path, she says she credits the journalism CTE program for equipping her with essential career skills. 

Rahman was among the students, school board members, educators and Eugene tech companies Gov. Kate Brown met with Nov. 1 in a South Eugene High classroom to learn more about the impacts of CTE.

Formed in 2008, Eugene Urgent Care has grown from one clinic near the University of Oregon to nine offices across Lane County. In the wake of this fast rise, a conflict arose about whether to unionize. 

On Aug. 19, the workers at Lane County Urgent Care clinics voted to unionize for collective bargaining power in a 72-70 count. The National Labor Relations Board must certify this referendum.

A Eugene homeless man is trying to convince a judge to dismiss three trespassing charges he received after Eugene police arrested him late at night for sleeping on public property.

Rod Adams, the 61-year-old defendant, and his lawyer, Joe Connelly, argue that his arrests violate the Eighth Amendment of the Constitution and involve the broader issue of criminalization of homelessness.

• Transition Management, Inc., 541-521-5897, plans to hire Nick’s Timber Services Inc., 503-910-1120, to spray 393.3 acres near Lorane Highway with atrazine, clopyralid, glyphosate, hexazinone, imazapyr, sulfometuron methyl, triclopyr with acid, MSO Concentrate and/or Crop Oil Concentrate. See ODF notification 2017-781-13148, call stewardship forester Brian Peterson at 541-935-2283 with questions.

• What about the footbridge across Franklin Boulevard from the new Knight campus at the University of Oregon to the science buildings on the other side? That was one of many questions asked of former state senator Chris Edwards when he described the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact to the City Club of Eugene on Nov. 3. Why not make it a two-tier bridge so it connects more than the science buildings? It could be a route for students to go to Duck games at Autzen Stadium or simply a way across busy Franklin for all students.

Last May’s Eugene 4J school board elections were the most contested in recent memory. Community Alliance for Public Education (CAPE) appreciated the deeper level of debate and analysis that took place. Mary Leighton, Jerry Rosiek and Maya Rabasa met last week to discuss their thoughts as runners up, running as outsiders.  

There is a major business “recruitment” project going on right now in our community, it’s called Project Titan, and I have absolutely no clue about who or what it is. Oh, I’ve tried, well, sort-of tried, to find out. I asked around, here and there, even chatted with a former colleague of mine. But regardless of who it is, it will play out the same, in secret meetings behind closed doors, out of public view. 

 “I thought I’d go to law school,” says Michelle Holman, who grew up in Medford, majored in sociology at the University of Oregon and then worked briefly at Zoozoo’s Restaurant in Eugene, “but then I met Richie.” Richie Gross was a Hoedad tree planter living in Deadwood, an unincorporated community in the Coast Range. The pair got married and purchased a parcel of land six miles up Deadwood Creek in 1979.

Ani DiFranco has had many labels — singer, multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, poet, activist, feminist, businesswoman — but at the end of the day she’s just Ani. Unlike so many in her business, DiFranco has flourished by staying true to her character and forging her own path.

Pete Bernhard, guitarist with the Santa Cruz-based The Devil Makes Three, says you’ll hear all kinds of old-timey music on his band’s latest release, Redemption and Ruin.

Los Angeles songwriter Phoebe Bridgers is emailing me from Europe, riding in a van somewhere between Germany and the Netherlands. “I can see miles and miles of forest,” Bridgers writes, “and every once in a while a big open field.” It’s a lonely scene that sits nicely alongside Bridgers’ lonely music.

NO TO ONE GRO

Hopefully the voters of Creswell will say no to One Gro (“Campaigning in Creswell,” Oct. 5). A corporate monopoly on a dispensary in that locale is unnecessary. Let other players get into that market.

I am concerned about plantations and where these corporations set up shop on quite a few city blocks, as in Eugene. Cultivation is okay, but this is a new venture in this state

William O’Brien, Eugene


DEFAZIO AND GUNS