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A handful of local organizations have come together to help administer the flu vaccine to people experiencing homelessness.

Bruce Tufts, a registered nurse at White Bird Medical Clinic and a volunteer at Egan Warming Center, started a conversation with other volunteers last year about the role they could play in addition to basic medical care.

Native American leader Winona LaDuke says she drove 700 miles to vote this year. 

Now in the wake of Donald Trump’s election, LaDuke — who is executive director of Honor the Earth, an organization whose mission it is to create awareness and support for Native environmental issues — says it’s time to “double down on work in the communities and continue our battles.” 

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) sent the Walmart Supercenters in Eugene and Newport warning letters for hazardous waste law violations on Sept. 29. Both facilities generate between 220 pounds and 2,200 pounds of hazardous waste per month, and the violations were discovered by DEQ during unannounced inspections.

• Spreading a little sunshine for the Earth post presidential election, we were delighted to see U.S. District Court Judge Ann Aiken decide in favor of 21 youth plaintiffs in their constitutional climate lawsuit against the president, federal agencies and the fossil fuel industry. The suit can now move forward in the courts.

The inspiration for the Glow Variety Show, producer Anna Miller says, “came from an initial spark of wanting to create, with nowhere to put it.” 

So three years ago, the choreographer, artistic director, mother and massage therapist got to work. 

As we’re heading towards a holiday for giving thanks, I’m thankful for the varied and interesting dance offerings in our community. 

Maybe you’re the person in your complex or neighborhood to break out the string lights and don your festive turtleneck sweaters the day after Halloween. 

Or perhaps you say “humbug” to the perpetuation of culturally exploitive and corrupt capitalism whilst you cozy up with some anarchist zines and a box of Franzia Blush (or kombucha).

From cuddly kittens to fat joints, there are plenty of wintery activities to help ease the impending gloom of winter. Here are the 12 Days of Euge-mas that you — yes, even you, little nihilist Grinch — can get down with.

Thursday, Nov. 17

The Holiday Night Market, a night of shopping to support local women in small business, fashion, beauty and craft vendors, 5-10pm today, at Venue 252, 252 Lawrence St. FREE.

Friday, Nov. 18

Fern Ridge Holiday Bazaar Weekend, food and crafts by local artisans, 9am-5pm today and Saturday, Nov. 21, 935-8443. FREE. Maps are available in Veneta at City Hall, Ray’s, Veneta-Fern Ridge Chamber of Commerce and most bazaar locations.

• The Native American Studies Program at the UO presents “Two Spirits One Hoop” with two spirit/trans* performer and educator Ty Defoe of the Giizhiig, Ojibwe and Oneida Nations 4 pm Friday, Nov. 18, at the UO Many Nations Longhouse, 1630 Columbia Street. Nov. 20 is Transgender Day of Remembrance. 

I can’t think Christmas without a deep chill running up my spine. I smell burning and I forget for a second where I’m standing.

Something bad, way back, deep. But swell things, too.

For Christma-phobes, stepping foot inside the year-round Christmas Treasures gift shop on the winding McKenzie River Highway is liable to send mean pulses of nostalgia through your being, and your heart into convulsive spasms, almost.

I’m pretty weary of the usual holiday fare — the warbling moppets, the repentant codgers, the treacle, the tinsel. And after 2016’s punishing slog? Please. I just can’t. 

So thank goodness Oregon Contemporary Theatre offers plenty of light-hearted laughs this season, with The Santaland Diaries and a visit from America’s favorite Dragapella Beauty Shop Quartet, the Kinsey Sicks.

It may seem strange to suggest that the path to peace is to roll up our sleeves and get our hands dirty regenerating the soil in our gardens and around the world. But this is more than a metaphor suggesting that building peace is like growing a healthy garden. 

The wars we fight, the deplorable state of public health and the surpassing of planetary limits leading to climate change can all be traced back to how we grow our food and view the earth as a resource base to be turned into commodities for consumption.

On Sunday, Nov. 20, from noon-2 pm, Tsunami Books will host a book release celebration for Kristin K. Collier of Eugene, author of the memoir Housewife: Home-remaking in a Transgender Marriage. After high school graduation in Eureka, California, Collier’s planned odyssey to New York to study theater took her only as far as Wyoming, where she met the son of a rancher. They got married and moved to Eugene, where she studied English and he majored in architecture at the UO.

YG might not be a rapper that everyone has heard of, but his politically straightforward message echoed throughout cities across the nation last Tuesday night as results of the presidential election filtered in. The Compton rapper released his single “FDT (Fuck Donald Trump)" back in March — and, in fact, someone drove down 13th Avenue repeatedly playing this during the Trump rally in May — but the catchphrase has remained a whopping battle-cry during this political cycle. 

Liat Lis and Kyle McGonegle — comprising the old-time folk duo — are a reminder that sometimes, musicians are made for each other. Beyond the lush, characteristic two-part vocal harmonies that carve a wake through Lake Toba’s music, there is songwriting and performance talent at work that Eugene has not seen since the string-band heyday of the previous decade. 

Comic book artist, musician and New York native Jeffrey Lewis comes to Eugene behind his 2015 release, the appropriately titled Manhattan. Like a lost Lou Reed album, Manhattan recalls a time when New York was friendlier to artists and freaks. 

Classical music institutions usually reach backward, content to be historical museums of music by long-dead composers. It wasn’t always thus: Composers like Bach and Beethoven would have been appalled to see how today’s orchestras play mostly yesterday’s music. Had that notion prevailed in their time, the music of those great composers wouldn’t have survived. That retro attitude, a product of the early-mid-20th century, has gradually been changing, and Eugene Symphony president Scott Freck wants his band to lead the way. 

BRAVE COVER

I am a senior at the University of Oregon majoring in journalism, history and political science. Thank you for your thoughtfulness in determining today’s cover. Given the grim results of the presidential election this week and the protests that proceeded, today’s cover could not have been more appropriate. I appreciate your bravery and journalistic integrity. This made my day.

Nicole Bales, Eugene

 

I’m a longtime fan—reader and listener—and part of the 47 percent of white women who did NOT vote for Donald Trump. To say I’m disappointed, horrified, scared, and mad about the election is woefully insufficient. I donated $100 to Planned Parenthood this morning because I honestly felt like there was nothing else I could do. That being said, I wanted to share that I had one of the most weirdly charged, hottest, and sexiest orgasms. A little buzzed (dealing with those election results) and sad, my boyfriend and I turned to each other for consolation.

If you’re looking for a distraction from the state of the world, Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival both is and isn’t the movie you’re looking for. The film’s previews suggest an actiony alien invasion, and while there are aliens, they’re hardly the angry insects that infest so many science fiction films. Instead, they look like hands with too many fingers, suspended, tips down. They sound like whalesong mixed with the groans of a building in a storm — a language Louise Banks (Amy Adams) can hardly hope to speak.

According to local homeless advocates, 273 students in Eugene were homeless and living without a parent or guardian last year. On top of that, 90 students dropped out, and advocates believe they have moved to the streets.

In response to this, activists and the city of Eugene formed 15th Night, a collaborative approach to help prevent youth homelessness in the 4J and Bethel school districts.

Every other year, University of Oregon professor Marc Schlossberg takes his students to the Netherlands or Denmark — Copenhagen is a bicycling utopia, where 45 percent of people commute by bike. It’s a cyclist’s dream come true.

Students from Eugene explore the European streets by bike, opening their eyes to a world where people take cycling seriously. 

“My mind was blown by the things I saw in Copenhagen,” writes student Holly Hixon in a 2015 compilation of the students’ reflections on the class. “The cycle track system is so complete, comfortable, heavily used by every type of person you can imagine and is ingrained in their way of life as a major form of transportation.”

When Tiffany Triplett joined the Women in Transition (WIT) program at Lane Community College, she says she was recovering from addiction and a divorce. “I was in the drug court program when I was in the WIT classes and it complemented my treatment program so much,” she says.

Months after ballooning construction costs sent the Eugene City Council back to the drawing board, councilors and city staff continue to thumb through a confusing array of City Hall possibilities.

Without a clue to indicate what the different possibilities might cost taxpayers, the council is taking stabs in the dark. Councilor Chris Pryor likened the muddled process to playing with Legos at an Oct. 19 Joint Elected Officials Work Session.