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A big congrats to Caitlyn Jenner on her big reveal and lovely Vanity Fair cover! But I am having a crisis of conscience. On one hand, I support a person’s right to be whoever the heck they want to be. You want to wear women’s clothing and use makeup and style your hair? You look fabulous! You want to carry a pillow around with an anime character on it and get married to it, like a guy in Korea did? Congrats! You want to collect creepy lifelike dolls and push them around in a stroller, like a woman on Staten Island does? Great!

Welcome to the next four months of your life. It’s finally time to pack away the umbrella (if you even have one — what kind of Eugenean are you?) and break out the sunglasses. Consider this guide your roadmap for the summer. Within this issue that you’ve wisely chosen to pick up, you’ll find wonders galore, from weeklong stargazing parties to kite-flying extravaganzas to wild three-day music festivals. Sounds fun? Yeah, we thought so. Use this knowledge wisely, and you’re guaranteed to have an amazing and memorable summer. So go on, get out there! And have a great time.

Pretty Paper
LCC reboots its continuing education courses in fashion with an emphasis on recycled materials and textiles

Flying High
Catch the breeze at Oregon’s summer kite festivals

Party with the Stars
The Eugene Astronomical Society is always looking up

Extreme Golfing
Cruise up to the green with GolfBoarding

Golfing is to sports what masturbation is to sex — a solitary endeavor that, no matter how vigorously you go at it, always ends up being about you and you alone, as you come face to face with your own failings in the universe as well as the measure of your stamina in overcoming them. I’ve been golfing, more or less vigorously, for years, and I’m sad to report that my game hasn’t improved one jot. It’s an existential dilemma. Golf, for me, is too often a good walk spoiled, just like people think Mark Twain said.

Before Connor Doran’s indoor kite-flying performances were wowing television audiences on season five of NBC’s America’s Got Talent, he was tearing up the skies on the beach at Lincoln City’s annual Summer Kite Festival. “It’s where I started out,” Doran says, who will perform at the next iteration of the annual kite festival in late June alongside a host of other champion kite fliers.

Nesting season is coming to a close this month, easily noticed with geese and turkey nestlings that leave their nests and swim or run right after hatching. One of the enjoyable sights of early summer is watching a troop of goslings or chicks paddling or scurrying around after their parents. They are out feeding for themselves, learning how to find and handle their food by following their parents. Most songbird babies stay in the nest until they are ready to fly. After they fledge and leave the nest, they are pretty much on their own.

For 25 years, the Hubble Space Telescope has captured images of astronomic wonders — nebulae, galaxies, star clusters — that exist millions of light years away from Earth. These pictures are spectacular, but for members of the Eugene Astronomical Society, there’s nothing quite like looking at the night sky with their own eyes. 

Newspapers aren’t dead (ahem, you are reading one). They’ve just been repurposed. Case in point: Turn to the cover of this issue and find the peacock-like ensemble Ariana Schwartz custom-crafted for EW’s 2015 Summer Guide. Look closely — Schwartz used EW’s recent Big Bird cover story to create the summery getup.

Sunny skies are predicted for this weekend: Hop on your bike and get outside June 6 at the upcoming Love Your West Eugene Wetlands Bike Tour, presented by Beyond Toxics and Mountain Rose Herbs. 

The tour begins at Mountain Rose Herbs and takes a 4.8-mile route along the Fern Ridge Bike Path as well as other bike routes. The tour will lead into the We Are Bethel: Drawn Together community celebration located at Petersen Barn. 

At approximately 1:30 am on Saturday, May 23, a group of six men attacked two women and one man on the sidewalk in front of Cowfish Dance Club in downtown Eugene. 

One of the men in the group punched Jasmyn Hinton in the eye and punched her partner Koen Derflinger in the face three times. The third person in the group — Nicole Foti — says she was hit in the stomach. Hinton, Derflinger and Foti say the six men were white, between the ages of 20 and 25, and looked like “stereotypical college guys.”

• ODOT is currently spraying roadsides. Call Tony Kilmer at ODOT District 5 at 744-8080 or call (888) 996-8080 for herbicide application information. Highways I-5, 101, 126. ODOT may spray Highway 36 soon.

• Weyerhaeuser Company, 744-4600, plans to spray 4,804 feet of roadside in the larger Lorane area with glyphosate, aminopyralid, triclopyr, metsulfuron methyl and/or MSO Concentrate. See ODF notification 2015-781-08283, call Brian Peterson at 935-2283 with questions.

In the last five years, several states have taken up regulating or banning surgeries to declaw cats or devocalize dogs, also known as “debarking” or ventriculocordectomy.

Now it’s Oregon’s turn to wrestle with the issue. 

 Debarking is illegal in Massachusetts and New Jersey. Several California cities, including Los Angeles, have banned declawing outright.

Back in June of 2014, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) hit Pacific Recycling with a $327,686 penalty for repeatedly discharging harmful levels of industrial pollutants to waters of the state and failing to install a treatment system in 2011 as it had promised to do. DEQ reduced the penalty to $47,494 in January and issued an order requiring Pacific Recycling to install its treatment system by Jan. 16; Pacific Recycling agreed to pay a penalty of $283,157 if it failed to meet this deadline. Pacific Recycling missed the deadline.

Jon Krakauer doesn’t start Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town (Doubleday, $28.95) with one of the worst scenes in the book; he eases into it with the police pulling up to tell a young woman named Allison Huguet that her rapist has confessed. 

Black students made up only 2.4 percent of the student body population at South Eugene High School at the beginning of the 2014-2015 school year. Five young African-American women will graduate from South on June 5, and EW caught up with three of them to discuss their plans for the future, their quests for diversity and their advice for young women of color growing up in Eugene.

• This week marks a changing of the guard at The Register-Guard, and outgoing Editor and Publisher Tony Baker wrote a farewell column in the daily’s Sunday Commentary section May 31. The column was clearly intended to diminish fears that new Editor and Publisher N. Christian Anderson III will oversee the kinds of changes at the R-G that he and the Advance Publications chain implemented at The Oregonian, taking the venerable Oregon daily and turning it into a pitiful tabloid.

Just heard this week that Cynthia Pappas is retiring as president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon, and the Board of Directors has hired Lisa Gardner, former intergovernmental relations manager for the City Manager’s Office in Eugene. Gardner was previously city planning director. Pappas has been head of PPSO for the past nine years. 

Who's who and what’s what in dance this month

• The Metropolitan Policy Committee meets from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm Thursday, June 4, at the Eugene Public Library. Public comment time is early in the meeting and one of  the agenda items is “Development of Draft Oregon Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan,” presented by Savannah Crawford of ODOT. Springfield Main Street public safety is also on the follow-up agenda. See lcog.org for more information.

I strongly urge Eugene’s leaders to ban tobacco smoking in public areas. As a longtime resident of Eugene and outdoor enthusiast, I appreciate our many opportunities for recreation.  As I cycle along the Willamette River bike trail, I also love to see how many other people enjoy our parks and public places. Having safe places for people to exercise or have family picnics while their children run and play are essential to our community’s well-being and liveability. By making downtown and city parks smoke-free, Eugene will once again be in the forefront of communities working together to protect residents from the harms of secondhand smoke. 

Recently there has been some confusion regarding proposals associated with “riverkeepers” and “river guardians” in Eugene. Willamette Riverkeeper (WR) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and restoration of the Willamette River. We accomplish this mission through four key initiatives: clean river, monitoring, river discovery education and habitat restoration. 

Purists may shudder, but musical miscegenation has always been the rule. “Enjoy hybrid music, because that’s all there is,” Oregon-born composer Lou Harrison often said. Regarded as the godfather of what became the world music movement, Harrison typically expressed this sentiment before demonstrating how just about every form of music emerges from encounters with the sounds of other cultures and times. 

Mischief Brew still makes music for the same reasons they did in high school. According to lead singer Erik Petersen, his guitar and the road are as addictive as a bad habit.

The Northwest metal scene is rife with stoner, doom and black metal stereotypes thick enough to choke out the sun. Still there are a precious few acts that transcend, escaping the mire to unfurl like wildflowers springing from the thorniest of thickets. Amongst these are local favorites Agalloch and Yob, in many ways kindred spirits, though vastly dissimilar in sound.

Had Yelawolf never elevated his game beyond the flush of his furious 2010 mixtape Trunk Muzik, which contained at least one bona-fide masterpiece in “Pop the Trunk,” he’d yet remain a significant footnote in the history of modern hip hop — an Alabama-born rapper of manic intensity and talent who gnawed his initials into the rusty proud husk of Southern culture on the skids of the 21st century.