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February 3, 2017 12:02 PM

It started with the Netherlands: ""We totally understand it's going to be America First — But can we just say 'The Netherlands Second?'" a Dutch TV show asked, adding in a Donald Trump-cadenced voice, "We speak Dutch. It's the best language in all of Europe. We've got all the best words. All the other languages? Failed. Danish? Total disaster."

The video went viral, with YouTube currently clocking in at more than 17 million views.

The Swiss response soon followed: "We are not flat, like for example, the Netherlands. Total disaster," the cheeky and inuendo-filled video intones in Trumpian tones. "Like the KKK we also like to ride on horses and burn things."

As a Dane, my favorite is Denmark's response, also using the Trumpified vocal talents of Shaun Streeter. "We know you like golden showers, excuse me, golden towers, and we  have one, the golden tower in Tivoli Gardens," and offering to turn its windpower to oil.

Lithuania, Portugal and Germany have all weighed in as well, and you can see all the videos at everysecondcounts.eu.

If you are laughing at Trump, Europe is laughing with you. If you are horrified by Trump, well, Europe is horrified too. 

January 31, 2017 11:52 AM

In a Jan 31 email to Lane Community College faculty and students, LCC President Mary Spilde writes of the recent executive orders from President Donald Trump temporarily banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries and that the orders affect four LCC students. She adds that Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students are still in limbo. 

Spilde's full statement is below.

Like many of you I have been dismayed and disappointed over the Presidential Executive Orders issued last week, particularly because of the impact on our students. These Orders were not processed or implemented in an orderly way causing a great deal of uncertainty, anxiety and extreme hardship for immigrants and refugees. The situation remains very fluid but along with our colleagues in our national associations we are monitoring events very carefully.

This kind of action does not align with the core values Lane lives by. It conflicts with the board policy on non-discrimination. I simply want to reaffirm our commitment to these values and policies and state that now, more than ever, we are unwavering in our commitment to equity and inclusion and to our students – all of our students. Lane is strengthened and enriched by the insights and culture brought by our international students and others and I believe that their presence contributes to international understanding and peace.

We have four students from one of the affected countries. We are reaching out to these students, listening and responding as we can. Our IESL and International Programs staff have been proactive in arranging activities to support students.

Of course, the impact of such reckless Orders goes far beyond these students. As Martin King said: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere … Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.”

For example, our Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students are still in limbo. Next week the board of education will take up a resolution on this matter that was deferred from an earlier meeting because of the snow storm. I expect the board to take a stand on behalf of our students.

I will keep you apprised of these issues as we learn more. For now, I ask that you reach out to one another and our students with compassion, caring and empathy.

January 27, 2017 04:10 PM

The Roseburg News-Review newspaper published a letter to the editor Jan. 25 calling for the murder of protesters.

Though the writer does not specifically refer to the Jan. 21 Women's March on Washington, the letter suggests shooting "a few of this year's crop" of protesters. 

The letter, written by Terry Stafford of Riddle, Oregon, was published online and in print under the headline "Working, tax-paying citizens they are not" and it starts off decrying protestors (spelled in the British style) for being "socialists" and "trying to bring down the United States."

The letter references the 1970 Kent State shootings of student Vietnam War protesters and was published 15 months after the Oct. 1, 2015 Umpqua Community College mass shooting in Roseburg  in which nine people were killed and eight were wounded.

Stafford writes, "How about we shoot a few of this year's crop — say a dozen at each protest to see how many were bussed [sic] in, paid well." He adds, "Of course, we will give all samples an absolutely free same-day burial at sea."

After a public outcry on the website, social media and calls and messages to the News-Review, the online letter was taken down. The editor's note  apologizes and says, "After reviewing our guidelines, which clearly state not to threaten the harm of another individual, we removed the letter. " 

 

 

January 5, 2017 02:16 PM

Press release of the day goes to SAIF for its advice on dealing with slippery sidwalks.

With inclement weather arriving in some parts of the state and forecast for others, SAIF again wants to remind Oregonians to "walk like a penguin."

"Slips, trips, and falls are the leading cause of injury in Oregon--both in and out of the workplace," said Scott Clark, safety innovations manager for SAIF. "Changing how you walk on slippery surfaces can mean the difference between making it home safely and taking an unexpected trip to the hospital."

Clark offers the following guidance for taking walking cues from our arctic friends:

*Keep your hands by your side (and not in your pockets).

*Slow down and take short steps.

*Walk flat-footed.

*Point your toes slightly to the sides. 

The not-for-profit insurance company supplied a video to illustrate its point:

January 2, 2017 12:39 PM

Now that the 49ers have fired Chip Kelly, on the heels of the University of Oregon firing football coach Mark Helfrich, you cannot help but to wonder if the former Ducks coach should have listened to the pleas of musician (and Ducks fan) Mat Kearney?

December 19, 2016 04:58 PM

The Electoral College voted Donald Trump in as president today. 

At least Saturday Night Live can still make us laugh. 

And Trump hates it and hates that you watch it.

December 5, 2016 10:31 AM

According to the website corpcounsel.com, "The University of Oregon has asked its general counsel, Kevin Reed, to look into whether the school's athletic department is violating university free-speech policies by allegedly threatening to pull the credentials of reporters who try to speak directly with student athletes."

Corporate Counsel, a publication that specializes in "addressing the needs of the nation’s in-house attorneys and executives," writes that the issue arose when the Daily Emerald reported  three incidents of violence over two years allegedly committed by Duck football tight end Pharaoh Brown.

According to a Nov. 28 Emerald story about the UO Senate calling for an investigation of athletic department for possible free speech violation, the Emerald reporter, Kenny Jacoby "had called kicker Matt Wogan for comment, following a prearranged interview in which Wogan declined to speak on the issue. The department’s policy states that all requests for interviews with players must go through the athletic department, and by calling a player directly, the Emerald knowingly violated that policy."

Corporate Counsel reports that "asked about an investigation, Reed confirmed that university president Michael Schill asked him 'to conduct a review. I wouldn't describe it as an investigation. I understand my brief is to report to the president regarding whether our rules governing the rights of speech of our student athletes and the rights of access of the press to our student athletes are consistent with university policy, law and best practices.' He said he expects to report back 'sometime after the first of the year.'"

November 30, 2016 03:24 PM

Four area state legislators will be holding a town hall next Wednesday evening at University of Oregon. Come meet the politicians you elected!

What: State Legislators Town Hall with Rep. Phil Barnhart, Rep. Paul Holvey, Sen. Lee Beyer and Sen. Floyd Prozanski 

When: 6:30 pm Dec. 7

Where: Crater Lake South Rm at UO’s Erb Memorial Union, 1228 University Street

November 23, 2016 04:03 PM

Janie Coverdell traveled from Eugene to Standing Rock in September to participate in the Sioux tribe's protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline. She recently returned to Cannon Ball, North Dakota, and is sending Eugene Weekly updates from the frontlines.

Coverdell, who is posting video on YouTube of events as Tlingit Girl, was present Nov. 20 when police began to shoot water at protesters in the below-freezing temperatures, as well as rubber bullets and tear gas. One protester, 21-year-old Sophia Wilansky, was severly injured and might lose her arm.

The Associated Press reports that Wilansky's father, Wayne Wilansky says his daughter was inured by the police: "There's multiple witnesses and my daughter, who was completely conscious, said they threw a grenade right at her."

Coverdell was in the thick of the Sunday night protests. She tells EW, "Unarmed women fell to their knees telling police they loved them and were praying for their generations, too. A police officer walked up and used high-pressure pepper spray right in their faces while their hands were in the air."

Coverdell says, "I followed police and called them out every time they approached peaceful protectors and as I drew attention to them for harming unarmed people the police would actually back off."

Coverdell says she was tear-gassed and sprayed with something else as well, adding that her stomach and throat are still not better. You can find her GoFundMe raising money for the trip to the protest here. She will continue to send updates.

Illustration by Trask Bedortha

November 17, 2016 12:08 PM

Press release is below.

City Council Renews Commitment to Safe, Inclusive Community

Council Resolution Opposes Acts of Hate, Intolerance and Encourages Reporting  

Council Resolution

Following one of the most divisive general elections in our country's recent history, with news reports of incidents of hate and bias occurring in other cities, Eugene officials have heard from members of vulnerable communities who are frightened and concerned for their safety.

To make clear its continuing commitment to a safe, welcoming community, at its meeting tonight the Eugene City Council unanimously approved a resolution stating, in part:

·       The City Council is committed to making Eugene a welcoming, inclusive, and safe community for everyone.

·       The City Council is committed to standing together with the people of Eugene in opposing hate and bias activities and acts of intolerance committed against our neighbors.  

·       The City Council is committed to report incidents of hate and bias and will build upon partnerships with community organizations to track and respond to these incidents.

The full resolution is attached and also copied below:  

Hate and Bias Incident Reporting and Response

The City of Eugene actively implements its Hate and Bias Response Plan, including responding to and tracking incidents, providing support to victims of incidents and producing an annual Hate and Bias report.

Although staff have seen no noticeable increase in recent days in reports directly to the City’s Human Rights and Neighborhood Involvement office or the Eugene Police Department, they have heard of local incidents from partner agencies.

The City of Eugene’s Office of Human Rights and Neighborhood Involvement (HRNI) encourages community members experiencing discrimination, hate or bias to report these incidents. According to the Department of Justice only 25-42% of all hate and bias crimes are reported.

To report such crimes or incidents, people may call either the Office of Human Rights and Neighborhood Involvement or the Eugene Police Department. HRNI provides community members an opportunity to report incidents and offers opportunities for support.

To file a report, community members may:

·       Stop by the HRNI office at 99 W. 10th Ave., Suite 116,

·       Call 541-682-5177, or

·       Online at http://www.eugene-or.gov/2476/Equity-and-Human-Rights-Contact-Form

If a person is experiencing immediate danger, they should call 911. People may also report incidents or crimes to the Police non-emergency line: 541-682-5111

 

 RESOLUTION NO. 5174

A RESOLUTION DECLARING THE CITY OF EUGENE’S COMMITMENT TO BEING A WELCOMING, INCLUSIVE, AND SAFE COMMUNITY FOR EVERYONE

        The City Council of the City of Eugene finds that:

A.      As the Mayor and City Council of the City of Eugene, we are united in our commitment to serve the people that we represent after the culmination of one of the most divisive general elections in our Country's history.

B.      In alignment with City Council’s goal of creating a safe and welcoming community, we are firm in our resolve to ensure that all people residing in, visiting and passing through the City of Eugene are safe.  We choose to be a leader in promoting human rights and social justice and equity, public safety and social well-being.

C.      The City of Eugene has a long standing history and commitment of supporting many communities who are experiencing hate, bias and discrimination and the City Council has adopted Ordinances and Resolutions that demonstrate this commitment, including:

1.      Human Rights Municipal Code provisions, EC 4.613 - 4.655 (adopted in 1971, with the most recent amendment adopted in 2014 which made it unlawful to discriminate based on gender (Ord. 20523))

2.      Resolution 5073 (adopted 2012) Support of a Statement of Principles for Immigrant Integration

3.      Resolution 5142 (adopted in 2015) A Resolution Declaring the Urgency of the Housing and Homelessness Crisis

4.      Resolution 5148 (adopted in 2016) A Resolution Declaring the Second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day

5.      Resolution 5150 (adopted in 2016) A Resolution Supporting the Oregon Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women

6.      Resolution 5154 (adopted in 2016) A Resolution Declaring the City of Eugene’s Commitment in Protecting Refugees

D.      We believe in and are committed to continue our work to build a community that is welcoming, inclusive, just and safe for everyone.

E.      We welcome all people and recognize the rights of individuals to live their lives with dignity, free of discrimination and targeting because of their age, faith, race, national origin, immigration status, gender identity, ability, ethnicity, housing status, sexual orientation, economic status or other social status.

F.      We are committed to treating all people fairly, and to fully embracing the unique contributions of all Eugene residents regardless of age, faith, race, national origin, immigration status, gender identity, ability, ethnicity, housing status, sexual orientation, economic status or other social status.

G.      We strongly condemn bias, intimidation, harassment and other acts that are based on age, faith, race, national origin, immigration status, gender identity, ability, ethnicity, housing status, sexual orientation, economic status or other social status.

H.      We are committed to ensuring that all members of our community are free from acts that are rooted in fear, ignorance, prejudice, and hate.

NOW, THEREFORE,

        BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF EUGENE, a Municipal Corporation of the State of Oregon, as follows:

 Section 1.  The City Council is committed to making Eugene a welcoming, inclusive, and safe community for everyone.

Section 2.  The City Council is committed to standing together with the people of Eugene in opposing hate and bias activities and acts of intolerance committed against our neighbors.  

Section 3.  The City Council is committed to its mechanisms the community can use to report incidents of hate and bias and will build upon partnerships with community organizations and local agencies to track and respond to these incidents in the City of Eugene's annual Hate and Bias report and at the direction of the City of Eugene's Hate and Bias Response Plan.

Section 4.  This Resolution is effective immediately upon its passage by the City Council. 

        The foregoing Resolution adopted the 14th day of November, 2016.

 

November 11, 2016 09:55 AM

Following the Nov. 8 election of Donald Trump to the U.S. presidency, universities, schools and other institutions are responding to the fears of hate and bigotry. Today, Oregon State University President Ed Ray sent out this missive:

Faculty, staff and students,

Many members of our university community are experiencing a range of significant, heartfelt emotions following Tuesday’s election.

Several faculty, staff and students have shared with me that they fear for their future and the futures of family members and friends, especially people from diverse backgrounds and identities. Other members of our community are expressing joy about political change. Each of these emotions is personal and powerful.

As members of our university community, we must care for each other and support one another despite the turmoil of the moment. If you are in need of assistance or would like to talk to someone about what you are experiencing, and are a Corvallis student, please visit the Student Affairs Student Resources website at http://experience.oregonstate.edu/resources. OSU-Cascades students should visit http://osucascades.edu/student-wellness. Employees needing assistance may utilize the OSU Employee Assistance Program by confidentially calling 1-800-433-2320 at any time or by calling the Human Resources Department at 541-737-3103.

I ask you to join me in looking ahead.

At this moment of national transition, we reaffirm that Oregon State’s mission of inclusive excellence in teaching, research, and outreach and engagement has not changed. OSU’s mission to promote economic, social, cultural and environmental progress for the people of Oregon, the nation and the world remains essential, and we will not realize our vision for the future unless we find common ground with those around us and unless we persist in this effort.

Since its founding, this country has overcome division and uncertainty by people coming together to address challenges, by respecting differences, and by demonstrating compassion and leadership.

This is the 56th presidential election in our nation’s history and every transition of leadership has occurred peacefully. The need for us to support each other, celebrate our diversity and promote the success of every member of our community and America remains unaltered. This is at the core of who we are and how we need to go forward.

On Wednesday, I saw impressive, moving and peaceful evidence of this America among us as dozens upon dozens of OSU students gathered in the Memorial Union quad throughout the day, and where approximately 400 students and community members marched through the evening on campus to call for an end to hate and to focus on our common humanity.

Let each of us help and serve one another. Let each of us help bring America together, while we count on and challenge all of our country’s leaders to do the same.

Going forward, I encourage you to stay engaged in our nation’s political process and lead your own lives in ways that reflect our common values as a community.

I am here to help, care and, with you, lead forward.

Edward J. Ray

November 10, 2016 12:03 AM

Zoie Gilpin was just leaving a meeting of the Black Student Union Nov. 9 on the University of Oregon campus when she came across three people painting themselves in blackface.

She says, "One person laughed and directed a comment at me saying, 'Sorry that my friends are racist,' followed by more laughing. I said, 'Do you think this is funny?'"

Gilpin who The Oregonian says is biracial tells EW that he replied, "Yes, I do [think it's funny]. I don't actually think that my friends are racist; we are doing this for fun." And she says he continued to laugh about it, so she began to record the video that she subsequently posted on Twitter and was shared by Malia Thomas in a public Facebook post. 

Gilpin says, "I'm infuriated. We were just discussing how we need to stick together as a black community" at the BSU meeting and "as soon as I leave, I run into this situation."

She adds, " It's not fair that we as a minority have to face this or any discrimination at all, let alone multiple times in a row. Blackface is just a thing now? And that's okay?"

She says the incident has been reportd to the campus police.

Update:

Below is the statement from the UO on the incident.

Dear Campus Community,
 
The University of Oregon has been made aware of an incident involving young people wearing blackface on campus this evening. The use of blackface is patently offensive and reinforces historically racist stereotypes. While there is no evidence that the individuals who wore blackface are part of the UO community, it has no place in our society or at the UO. 
 
We commend the members of the UO community who have expressed themselves through a series of peaceful demonstrations today that were respectful of other members of our community. In addition, the students who witnessed this incident, showed great maturity and judgment in their reaction to it.
 
The incident has been reported to Student Life and the UOPD, which has doubled their patrols on campus this evening. The UO is committed to fostering a campus culture that values diversity, equity, and inclusion. We continue to be focused on supporting our students and providing a welcoming, safe, and respectful environment.
 
Sincerely,
 
Dr. R. Kevin Marbury
Interim Vice President for Student Life
 

 

 
November 10, 2016 04:26 PM

What gives us hope and how do we resist the results we fear from a Trump presidency?

Send us your events, your ideas your activism. Resistance is not futile. As we wrote in slant this week:

We are in shock at the dawning of a Trump presidency and all that we stand to lose: Roe v. Wade, civil rights, immigration reform, media freedom, minority representation, climate change, the list goes on. The path to resistance becomes clear. Don’t circle the wagons; don’t snipe at the Bernie voters. It’s time to listen to the anger of those who elected Trump as well as to the thoughts and fears of those who are most hurt by the policies Trump has said he will put into place. We won’t give in to hate and despair. We will reassess and move forward to create the nation we want to be.

Jezebel has been compiling  "A List of Pro-Women, Pro-Immigrant, Pro-Earth, Anti-Bigotry Organizations That Need Your Support." And we'd love to hear from you of organizations locally who are in that fight.

Locally, here are some ideas for hope and activism.

Hope

• South Eugene High School students marching Nov. 9 to say hate and fear do not represent them. 

Youth activists winning in the battle to stop climate change Nov. 10.

Activism

• Protest Trump in Eugene! 5 pm Nov. 10, starts at Erb Memorial Union on the University of Oregon campus and goes to Kesey Square (aka Broadway Plaza, 10 E. Broadway) downtown. 

• Vigil for Hope and Respect starts at 5 pm Nov. 10 at Kesey Square 

• Protest Trump March Monday, Nov. 14, 5 pm, Island Park in Springfield. 

Do you have ideas? Events? Hope? Activism? Send them to editor@eugeneweekly.com. Or write a letter and send to letters@eugeneweekly.com.