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October 29, 2012 04:14 PM

Hurrican Sandy is hitting, and our Facebook and Twitter feeds are full of dramatic pictures of the storm. And fake pictures of the storm. That inspiring shot of the soldier guarding the tomb of the Unknown Soldier? It's recent … from September.

And that really dramatic shot of the storm swirling over the Statue of Liberty? Check out this FB post.

The Atlantic has come up with a handy "Insta-Snopes" guide to fake storm photos. Or you can just go right to the real Snopes BEFORE you post.

October 26, 2012 10:16 AM

Just to keep you up-to-date on Lane County news: We are a hotbed of gonnorhea.

 

Number of STI Cases in Lane County Spike According to Health Officials

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

According to Lane County Health & Human Services, the latest data on reported cases of sexually transmitted disease and infections shows a nearly 40 percent increase in the number of gonorrhea cases and a 14 percent increase in Chlamydia compared to the same time period in 2011. Both gonorrhea and Chlamydia are major causes of serious reproductive complications in women and gonorrhea can facilitate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission.

“We are very concerned by the numbers we’re seeing here in Lane County, both due to the long term damage these infections can cause and the fact that they are often symptomless,” said Lane County Health Officer, Dr. Patrick Luedtke.

While some men may experience painful urination coupled with abnormal genital discharge, most women with gonorrhea experience either no symptoms or mistake the associated painful urination, bleeding and vaginal discharge with a bladder or vaginal infection. According to Luedtke, prevention and effective treatment are the cornerstones of control efforts. 

“Nationally, treatment of gonorrhea has been complicated by the ability of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to develop antimicrobial resistance, here in Oregon we have no documented resistance, which is good news for infected individuals,” said Luedtke.

All individuals are urged to practice preventative measures, such as condom usage and regular testing, and if you suspect you may have gonorrhea or Chlamydia, see your physician immediately. 

Lane County Health & Human Services is a department of Lane County. Their programs and services create a healthier and safer community through disease prevention, health promotion, and protection from environmental threats. Learn more about the work of Lane County Health and Human Services at: http://www.lanecounty.org/Departments/HHS  

Jason Davis

Lane County Health & Human Services

Public Information Officer

(541)246-2043 (Direct)

www.lanecounty.org/hhs

Just out of curiosity: Anyone know why the county is lower casing gonnoreah but upper casing chlamydia? I just want to make sure I've got the right sexually transmitted-nfection grammar for future reference.

October 19, 2012 04:21 PM

While coal trains have been in the news lately, they aren't the only potentially damaging fossil fuel export coming through Oregon's backyards, ranches, forests and streams. Liquified natural gas (LNG) is still a looming issue.

To learn more, check out this video by Rogue Riverkeeper, KS Wild and Balance Media.

October 18, 2012 04:02 PM

UPATE: The agenda AND materials are posted on the Board of Commissioners' website several days before the next meeting. Woohoo! Looks like they want to change their regular meeting day to Tuesday, rather than Wednesday. 

*****

Whether for or against coal trains, no one was happy that the conservative majority on the Board of Lane County Commissioners was planning to vote on the issue last week (oh, sorry, vote on the Coos Bay Bulk Terminal the coal trains would be heading to) without giving anyone advance notice to make public comment.

EW found the brief mention of the vote on the county agenda, and after we asked some questions, we found out that a coal train vote was scheduled. 

Then after the public began to voice dismay about the vote, the commission rescheduled it.

Then yesterday, they decided not to vote at all. Oops. Well you can still weigh in on coal at the Oct. 22 City Council meeting.

So let's keep the county government accountable. Agendas are sent out in advance of meetings. Sometimes the week before, sometimes only a couple days before. Agenda materials (the stuff explaining the items listed, which are sometimes a little vague) get posted at various times. Sometimes, as in the case of the coal trains resolution, only 24 hours before a scheduled vote.  Below is this week's agenda. Per usual, it doesn't spell out items under "Commissioners Business" or in some other places, but it gives you the general idea of what's going to be discussed.

For next week, I'm curious about the item  under County Administation where there are plans to change the day of the week the commissioners meet. The current schedule is meeting Wednesdays with Tuesdays also a possibility (scroll down to section 3.005). Alas the agenda doesn't say what the new option is, or why the change — hopefully because they are trying to make it easier to get information about meetings and votes to the public. Thoughts? 

 

 

AGENDA                                                                                   LANE COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

                                                Public Service Building, 125 East 8th Avenue, Eugene, OR  97401

                                                                  Phone (541) 682-4203    Web site: www.lanecounty.org

Legend                                                                     the meeting location is wheelchair-accessible.  Anyone needing

PM-Previous Material                                           special accommodations (hearing impaired, language translation,

NBA - Notice of Board Action                             chemical sensitivity needs, and large print copies of agenda),

# - Sign-Up Sheets Available at Entrance            please make your request at least 48 hours prior to the meeting.

Find out about more Lane County events at www.lanecounty.org/Calendar                                                                                                                                          www.twitter.com@LCBoard

*Note: Complete Copy of Agenda Packet Material is available for review in the Commissioners' Office*

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24,  2012 – REGULAR MEETING

(9:00 a.m.)                              (Board of Commissioners’ Conference Room)

1.     COUNTY ADMINISTRATION

A.     PUBLIC HEARING – ORDER 12-10-24-01/ In the Matter of Adopting the FY 12-13 Supplemental Budget #1, Making, Reducing, and Transferring Appropriations. (Christine Moody, Budget Manager) (estimated 10 minutes) (9:00 a.m. TIME CERTAIN)

2.     ADJUSTMENTS TO THE AGENDA

 3.     #PUBLIC COMMENTS 

Expected maximum time 20 minutes:  Speakers will be taken in the order in which they sign up and will be limited to 3-minutes.  If the number wishing to testify exceeds 7 speakers, then additional speakers may be allowed if the chair determines that time permits or each speaker's time may be reduced to fit within 20 min.)

4.     COMMISSIONERS' RESPONSE TO PUBLIC COMMENTS AND/OR OTHER ISSUES AND REMONSTRANCE (2 min. limit)

5.     EMERGENCY BUSINESS

6.     CONSENT CALENDAR

(All items listed here are considered to be routine by the Board of Commissioners and will be enacted by one motion in the form listed below.  There will be no separate discussion of these items.  If discussion is desired, that item will be removed from the Consent Calendar and will be considered separately.)

BEGINNING OF CONSENT CALENDAR * * * * (estimated 2 minutes)

A.     County Administration

1)     ORDER 12-10-24-02/ In the Matter of Approving Minor West Eugene Enterprise Zone (WEEZ) Boundary Amendment to Allow Investments by Local Businesses (Oakshire Brewing and Hop Valley) to Utilize the Program. (Glenda Poling, Manager, Lane County Community & Economic Development Division)

2)     ORDER 12-10-24-03/ In the Matter of Appointing Two Pools of Board Members Who May be Selected by the County Clerk to Sit on the Board of Property Tax Appeals. (Cheryl Betschart, County Clerk)

B.     Public Safety

1)     ORDER 12-10-24-04/ In the Matter of Amending Chapter 3 of Lane Manual to Transfer Weighmaster Staff and Responsibilities from Sheriff to Public Works. (Chief Deputy Hooley)

C.     Public Works

1)     ORDER 12-10-24-05/ In The Matter Of Accepting Deeds For Land To Be Used For County Road Purposes For Jasper Lowell Road AKA Pioneer Street (County Road Number 360 & 1065)  (19-01-14) (Mike Jackson, County Surveyor)

2)     ORDER 12-10-24-06/ In The Matter Of Accepting Deeds For Strips Of Land To Be Used For County Road Purposes For Meadowview Road (County Road Numbers 889 & 898)  (16-04-30 & 16-05-25) (Mike Jackson, County Surveyor)

3)     ORDER 12-10-24-07/ In The Matter Of Accepting Deeds For A Strip Of Land To Be Used For County Road Purposes For Sutton Lake Road (County Road Number 730)  (17-12-35) (Mike Jackson, County Surveyor)

4)     ORDER 12-10-24-08/ In the Matter of Authorizing the Sale of Surplus County Owned Real Property to Molly Jo Simmons, Former Owner of Record, for $17,190 (Map No. 18-03-06-41-01600, 135 E. 24th Place, Eugene) (Jeff Turk, Property Management Officer 2)

5)     ORDER 12-10-24-09/ In the Matter of Authorizing the Sale of Surplus County Owned Real Property to Molly Jo Simmons, Former Owner of Record, for $50,376 (Map No. 18-03-04-32 Tax Lots 5601 And 5602, 2790 Central Blvd., Eugene) (Jeff Turk, Property Management Officer 2)

END OF CONSENT CALENDAR * * * *

7.     COUNTY ADMINISTRATION

A.     Announcements

(updated order numbers from this point on)

B.     ORDER 12-10-24-10/ In the Matter of Amending Lane Manual to Revise the Regular Meeting Day of the Lane County Board of Commissioners (LM 3.005). Effective December 1, 2012. (David Suchart, Acting County Administrator) (estimated 10 minutes)

8.     COUNTY COUNSEL

A.     Announcements

9.     COMMISSIONERS’ BUSINESS

A.     Announcements

10.  PUBLIC WORKS

A.     ORDER 12-10-24-11/ In the Matter of Prohibiting Alcohol Consumption at Whitely Landing. (Mike Russell, Parks Manager) (estimated 30 minutes)

B.     ORDER 12-10-24-12/ In the Matter of Approving the River Road – Santa Clara Storm Water Basin Master Plan. (Daniel Hurley, Senior Engineering Associate) (estimated 20 minutes)

11.  REVIEW ASSIGNMENTS

12.  EXECUTIVE SESSION as per ORS 192.660

            (Commissioners' Conference Room)

13.  OTHER BUSINESS

 

October 18, 2012 01:10 PM

The Gangnam Style song and video is fine, but as happens sometimes, the parodies are even better.

Open condom style ("made entirely with condoms").

Mitt Romney style

 

And since as far as I can tell the UO Duck is pretty much a part of everything these days. Dunno what's worse. The Duck under the Ems mascot's legs that somehow brings that horrifying Big Bad Wolf song's video to mind or that they bleep "sexy" out of the sexy lady lyric in an awkward attempt to be PC. (Hey UO, wanna be PC? give more attention and cash to women's sports.)

I'd keep going but the beat does get old after a while.

October 15, 2012 10:28 AM

A recent story from In These Times alleges that the Koch Brothers are trying to control employee votes in Oregon. Eugene is home to a Georgia-Pacific plant that we featured in a recent cover story on toxics in west Eugene. 

The election story begins:

Koch Sends Pro-Romney Mailing to 45,000 Employees While Stifling Workplace Political Speech

The billionaire Koch brothers have found a new way to influence the 2012 electionn — preaching to employees

Much has been written about the owners of Koch Industries, brothers David H. Koch and Charles G. Koch, trying to control the political process through hundreds of millions of dollars in donations to right-wing causes and candidates. Now, an In These Times investigation reveals that the billionaires have broken out another tactic to influence the 2012 elections: attempting to control their workers’ votes.

In a voter information packet obtained by In These Times, the Koch Industries corporate leadership informed tens of thousands of employees at its subsidiary, Georgia Pacific, that their livelihood could depend on the 2012 election and that the company supports Mitt Romney for president. The guide was similar to one the company distributed before the 2010 midterm elections, which Mark Ames and I reported on in The Nation last year.

The packet arrived in the mailboxes of all 45,000 Georgia Pacific employees earlier this month.

The packet featured a cover letter, by Koch Industries President and Chief Operating Officer Dave Robertson, as well as  "flyer listing Koch-endorsed candidates, beginning with Romney. Robertson’s letter explained: 'At the request of many employees, we have also provided a list of candidates in your state that have been supported by Koch companies or by KOCHPAC, our employee political action committee.'"  

The cover letter reads:

If we elect candidates who want to spend hundreds of billions in borrowed money on costly new subsidies for a few favored cronies, put unprecedented regulatory burdens on businesses, prevent or delay important new construction projects, and excessively hinder free trade, then many of our more than 50,000 U.S. employees and contractors may suffer the consequences, including higher gasoline prices, runaway inflation, and other ills.

The packet also included a packet that also included "an anti-Obama editorial by Charles Koch and a pro-Romney editorial by David Koch. The letter went on to say, 'We believe any decision about which candidates to support is — as always — yours and yours alone, based on the factors that are most important to you. Second, we do not support candidates based on their political affiliation.'"

But In These Times reports that " In the flyer sent to Oregon employees, all 14 Koch-backed state candidates were Republicans."

For the full story go here.

October 12, 2012 03:23 PM

Presidential and VP-debate watching is a apparently best done with a drink in hand for the games (he said 47 percent!) or done the next day after it's been badly lip read or songified.

October 10, 2012 11:59 AM

I have to admit I wasn't following the mayoral race in Ashland this fall. It's a little out of EW's range. But like a lot of  people I get some of my election news from Comedy Central these days. John Stewart and Stephen Colbert from debating Bill O'Reilly to Super Pacs (Making a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow) make elections worth following even for the most jaded of politics-haters. (I'm not a jaded politics hater, but I sympathize). 

So it turns out that a fellow who calls himself Biome Michael Erickson is running for mayor of Ashalnd. Comedy Central has deemed him a "one of a kind candidate" (sponsored by Dr. Pepper). Democracy: It's not just for famous people. Indeed as of Oct. 10, Biome's Facebook page had only 21 likes. 

According to his webpage, here's Biome Michael Erickson's info from his Voters Pamphlet statement.

Occupation: Organic Food Manufacturer, Landscaper, Farm Laborer 

Occupational Background: Handyman, Mendicant 

Educational Background: Penn State University 

Prior Governmental Experience: Researcher, Active Pacifist 

 

He supplies a strong endorsement:

“Over 38 years, living at 19 different locations, in 4 states, I can say that Michael is the best neighbor I've ever had.” -Wayne Perry / Next-door neighbor

Though I will admit it puzzled me a little, since he also says on his webpage that he's spent kind of a lot of time "homeless" (his quotation marks). 

As Comedy Central points out, one of the best parts of Biome's campaign is the statement he provided to the Chamber of Commerce.

The requirements, as I understand them, to qualify for Mayor are these: I had to be an Ashland resident and I had to be registered to vote.  This means, simply, I had to be Human to be Mayor.  My skills and accomplishments are these: I have run the gauntlet of modern American culture and survived.  I have reclaimed my mind from the lies and distortions propagated by the mass media.  I have verified that I am not the machine the public education system wished to make of me, but that I am a living soul, with free will, choosing to align with a higher order.  I have risen above the temptations that mire people in obscurity.  I have accomplished what many others before me have accomplished, and I follow in their footsteps.  I have become ordinary, an ordinary human being who wishes to serve his humanity and his planet to the best of his ability.  These are my skills and accomplishments.  Please accept them as such.

And later in answer to the question of define the role of mayor as it pertains to his position:

My position is that of an ordinary human being.  What else could it be?  I have the same needs as every other creature on this planet.  I breathe, posture, and attitude.  I have a heart, brains, guts, and a spine.  I eat and drink.  I work.  I exercise, play and sleep.   I empathize with suffering and give charity where due.  I share with others what I learn along the way. From a selfish position, I'd prefer if I didn't have to seek elected office.  I'd prefer to just go on living a simple life basking in a one-sided view of bliss.   And from a self-LESS position, I can't help but to sacrifice my personal time, space and energy to bring relief to an imperiled world. … 

As for the definition of the role of Mayor as it applies to my position: the Mayor is, hopefully, also a human being akin to myself.

Indeed, since as he points out earlier, being human and living in Ashland appear to be the only requirements, so he's good to go! For the full Indecision blog post, go here. 

October 10, 2012 09:45 AM

In case you missed last week's presidential debate or plan to sit out tomorrow's VP debate, the bad lip reading version is available. 

October 9, 2012 06:54 PM

The dramatic music … the dramatic opening. "It is a place time seems to have left behind. A neighborhood literally seen by thousands of eyes every day … yet seemingly noticed by none … a dwelling where death at times is nothing more than an opportunity to recycle life … welcome everyone to THE WHIT!"

I don't think I was supposed to giggle as much as I did. "It's a heartbeat formed by the symbiotic relationships of the inhabitants … " The voiceover kills me. Lots of great Whit cameos as well as Mayor Kitty Piercy, Police Chief Pete Kerns, videographer Tim Lewis and more. 

October 4, 2012 11:07 AM

There were a lot of things to critique in the debate last night. But there was one thing that really stuck  out for a lot of people.

Gov. Mitt Romney not only is mean to dogs. He wants to take out Sesame Street. He told moderator Jim Leher of PBS's NewsHour at last night's debate:

I’m sorry, Jim, I’m going to stop the subsidy to PBS. I like PBS. I love Big Bird. I actually like you, too. But I’m not going to keep spending money on things, borrowing money from China

Oh yeah? Let the memes and tweets begin.

 

 

According to the Christian Science Monitor

Both public radio and public television get their federal funding (small but crucial percentages of their budgets, administrators say, which are often earmarked for under-served and rural populations) from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, for its part, gets a bit under $500 million in taxpayer dollars a year to distribute.

No small amount of change by itself, but in the grand scheme of the federal budget, not so much. It’s a few days of war in Afghanistan, according to many estimates. Just to put it in perspective.

As to the percentage of that $500 million that Big Bird actually pockets?  Pretty tiny. 

Finally, Jezebel wins for best post-debate wrap up:

 

5. Romney knows all about lying because he's got 5 sons. Wha?

Despite his non-pants-shitting performance, there were still a few moments of off-putting weirdness in the debate. Specifically, this quote:

"I've got five boys. I'm used to people saying something that's not always true, but just keep on repeating it and ultimately hoping I'll believe it."

I'm now concerned with Mitt Romney's merry band of sociopaths roaming the country.

Speaking of lies, Mitt Romney used last night to resurrect the idea of Obamacare being akin to a government takeover of medical care, which was Politifact's 2010 Lie of the Year. Yes, Mitt Romney is very familiar with falsehoods that get repeated over and over again as fact.

October 2, 2012 11:25 AM

The controversial coal train issue is coming before the Board of Lane County Commissioners tomorrow (10/3), according to an agenda item buried under "County Administration." Though the issue has been in the news and is a source of debate among Lane County and Eugene residents, it appears no effort was made by the county to publicize the vote. The upcoming 10/8 Eugene City Council vote on the issue has been a source of controversy and of news stories in the R-G and EW for months.

The county's vote will take place tomorrow at the Public Service Building, 125 East 8th Avenue, and public comments can be made at the beginning of the meeting, which starts at 9 am. Commissioners can also be contacted via phone or email through the county's website.

Click the image to view the agenda on the county's website.

Though as of Tuesday morning, one day before the vote, the  "view materials" link still does not have the information about the vote, EW obtained the supporting documents on the "Port of Coos Bay Bulk Terminal Support" issue (See below). One of them (Exhibit D) is a  white paper summary of the coal controversy and the other (Attachment D) is a resolution that specifically mentions the shipping of coal and  concludes:

Now, therefore, be it resolved that the Lane County Board recognizes the responsible development activities of the Port of Coos Bay related to increasing its ability to deliver, store, and transfer bulk commodities to the global marketplace.

ADOPTED this ______ day of October, 2012

 EW has contacted County Administrator Liane Richardson, Board Chair Sid Leiken, Intergovernmental Relations Manager Alex Cuyler, who is scheduled to bring up the issue, and the county public information officer for more information on the coal train vote and its scheduling.

The white paper that accompanies the resolution says:

Coal dust contains heavy metals including arsenic, cadmium, benzene, mercury, and lead.  Project developers say they would use a “surfactant,” a sticky spray on top of the rail cars, to limit coal dust.  The Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway conducted extensive testing on 1,633 coal trains and found that sealants sprayed on loaded coal cars dramatically reduced coal dust – in some cases to zero.  Increased train traffic also means increased diesel exhaust.  In Oregon, over 130 doctors have asked Governor Kitzhaber to order a comprehensive “health impact assessment.”  Physicians opposing coal export are primarily concerned with the effect of diesel particulates on pulmonary and neurological functions.

In Eugene, the Trainsong, River Road, Bethel, and Whiteaker neighborhoods are particularly vulnerable.  Other health and safety concerns include noise pollution, increased railroad mortality, and obstruction of emergency vehicle access.  In addition, the accumulation of coal dust could damage crops, contaminate water, pollute the air, and poison the wildlife.  Coal dust also corrodes and undermines rail infrastructure, so coal trains have a high risk of derailment.  Five coal trains derailed in the U.S. during the summer of 2012, one just outside the Columbia River Gorge in Washington.

But according to the county's proposed resolution, this is mitigated because:

WHEREAS, the Port has clearly stipulated delivery standards that will minimize or eliminate fugitive dust emissions escape from rail cars …

Beyond Toxics, Cascadia Wildlands and other local groups have weighed into to object to coal trains and will likly speak at tomorrow's commissioners meeting.

UPDATE: The county says the documents supporting the Coos Bay Terminal agenda item are now up on the website.

October 2, 2012 07:42 PM

Local coal train opponentswere a little surprised to discover that the Lane County Board Commissioners will be voting on Wednesday Oct. 3 on supporting the Coos Bay Bulk Terminal development and the accompanying planned coal trains. It's a pretty a hot topic, one the public has had a lot of opinions on, and the upcoming Oct. 8 Eugene City Council vote on the issue has been well-publicized. Lane County buried the vote on the planned resolution in an agenda item

EW asked Intergovernmental Relations Manager (or as he says on his Twitter profile, lobbyist) about tomorrow's resolution. Cuyler preferred to respond by email, so here's our questions and his answers.

What significance does the county commission vote have, either by supporting or not supporting the Coos Bay Terminal proposal? 

The County Board of Commissioner will take action on a resolution, which expresses their opinion, but does not carry the same weight as an order.  A resolution is non-binding and unenforcible statement.  The Port may use it as they seek to advance their operations.  As a partner to the Port, the Board has signed a number of letters of support for specific, and more general funding opportunities.  In August 2008, Lane County was at the Surface Transportation Board hearing on transferring ownership (actually the hearing was on opposing the petition of the previous operator to dismantle the line) of the short line railroad to the Port. The Board’s agenda setting team is aware the Eugene City Council will be taking up a related issue on October 8.

The resolution as worded on the website is in favor of support how was that decision made and by whom?

The Lane County Legislative Committee examined the white paper last week. Discussions at that meeting informed the content of the resolution.  For example, staff asked whether the resolution should address coal trains, Coos County’s economic condition, or the Port.  The committee’s focus was on the Port’s bulk terminal expansion proposal.  As with most resolutions and orders, staff drafted the language for the full Board to consider.  Tomorrow, the Board may choose to modify it, abandon it, or adopt it as written.

The resolution mentions things put into place to restrict the coal dust, but has there been anything ensuring that can and will be done? I believe [Congressman Peter] DeFazio said that might have to be done legislatively?

The Port’s documents are clear environmental considerations were one of three “top weighted” issues.  While the Port does not regulate coal dust standards, it appears contractually and operationally, they have committed to minimizing fugitive emissions.  For example, the site design for the bulk terminal involves covered loading/unloading.  The rail car’s being proposed are “rotary dump” with the bottom of the car being completely solid (at one of their early briefings with us, I learned that most “dust” comes from the bottom of a traditional, bottom unloading car).

It’s a pretty controversial issue, why was the public not notified? The agenda item doesn't mention coal trains, though the white paper and the actual resolution do.

The Lane County Board of Commissioners routinely considers controversial issues at its regular, publicly noticed meetings.  The issue at hand is the bulk handling terminal.  The white paper and resolution reference the materials to be handled, including coal.

October 2, 2012 09:15 PM

News about the Bandon, Ore. man that was eaten by his 700-pound pigs has been getting some traction since it broke yesterday. It actually happened last Wednesday, but the folks at the Coos Bay District Attorney's office didn't release the news til it began to leak and they realized , "Wow, people are kind of freaking out."

How did this happen?

DA Paul Frasier tells The Eugene Register-Guard. "For all we know, it was a horrific accident, but it’s so doggone weird that we have to look at all possibilities,” 

The details are little Stephen King-ish.

First, the family member found Garner’s dentures on the ground. He then noticed pieces of Garner’s body scattered throughout the enclosure, Frasier said.

While investigators are certain that the hogs consumed most of Garner’s body, they do not know how he died. An investigation is continuing.

 

Any time someone dies I think it's tragic, but there are so many things ever so wrong with this incident. Vegans might disagree; they might think being eaten by a 700-pound pig is karmic payback for bacon. Or more precisely for the upcoming bacon shortage that was caused by folks going hog-wild and slaughtering their pigs early  thanks to the drought in much of the U.S. and in Europe. 

Let's start with the 700-pound pig thing; that, as the spider writes in the web in everyone's favorite childhood book about a cheerful and plucky swine, is "some pig."

I bet Wilbur would NEVER eat a farmer.

The R-G reports:

John Killefer, who heads the Animal and Rangeland Sciences Department at Oregon State University in Corvallis, called the incident involving Terry Garner both “very unfortunate” and highly unusual.

Although domestic hogs are not typically known to be as aggressive as their feral cousins, “there is some degree of danger associated with any animal,” Killefer said. He added that pigs “are more omnivorous than other farm animals, (such as) cows.”

Killefer said 700-pound pigs such as the ones that Garner kept at his farm for breeding purposes are abnormally large.

And just what was the unfortunate Mr. Garner doing with the 700-pound pigs? According to the news story, he had a boar named Teddy and several rather large sows, and he bred them to sell to 4-H kids. Yup, there are kids in rural, coastal Oregon raising Wilburs of their own, that are descended from Teddy and his fellow human-eating sows. No word in the story as to what to happen to Teddy and his crew, but let's just saying making THOSE particular pigs into pork would be so, so wrong.