• Eugene Weekly Loves You!
Share |

EW! A Blog.

July 2, 2012 07:21 PM

Lane County is facing an open meetings lawsuit. Marianne Dugan, attorney for Rob Handy, filed a suit on his behalf June 29. At issue is the May 3 "emergency meeting" that was held without 24 hour's notice by Sid Leiken, Jay Bozievich and Faye Stewart, the conservative majority on the Lane County Board of Commissioners who are named in the suit.

Under Oregon law if a meeting is held without the 24 hours notice, the reason for this must be stated in the minutes. No minutes have been published and the video of the meeting does not include a statement justifying the short notice. (Warning the county videos don't work on most Macs.)

More on the suit in this week's EW, and for background, take a look at our previous stories on the issue, North Eugene Commish Race Gone WildCounty Stymies Public Records Request,  Big Money for Public Records and Conservatives Got Advance Meeting Notice

July 2, 2012 02:44 PM

July 4 fireworks are known for scaring pups. If you lose your dog or find a stray this week the Greenhill/Lane County Animal Services transition may have you confused. Greenhill Humane Society started running the LCAS shelter as of July 1, and it appears that lost and found animals will be on the Greenhill website.

The city of Eugene has posted a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document on its website. Head's up it's a pdf.

Eugene Police Department tells us you can call the animal services’ direct line 24/7 at 541-687-4060 to report: a found animal, lost pet, animal at large or animal abuse.

Lane County tells us that if you lose a pet in the city of Eugene, “Typically, people should call the City of Eugene’s hotline 541-687-4060.”A secondary source of information could be Greenhill (541-689-1503) or the Greenhill Humane Society website http://www.green-hill.org, the county says.

Similarly, people within the City of Springfield should call 541-726-3634 for Springfield’s Animal Control Office and then check Greenhill.

Lane County Animal Services will not have an animal welfare officer on duty, July 4, we are told, but Lane County tells us word is that Eugene will have two officers on duty. People will be able to leave a message on the Lane County message line at 541-682-3645.  Lane County residents can also check with Greenhill to see if their animal has been admitted to the shelter.

And the Greenhill site repeats the info and gives a couple more numbers: 

 

If you have lost or found a pet, you should also immediately contact your local animal control office to file a lost pet report.

Contact information is listed below.

• Cottage Grove - Humane Society of Cottage Grove: (541-942-3130) 
• Eugene - Eugene Animal Services: (541-687-4060) 
• Unincorporated Lane County - Lane County Animal Services: (541-682-3645) 
• Springfield - Springfield Animal Control/Police Dept.: 344 A Street (541-726-3634)
• Veneta - Veneta Animal Control/City Hall: 88184 8th street (541-935-2191)

June 29, 2012 11:59 AM

As promised in this week's New Briefs, here's the full text of Greenhill Executive Director Cary Lieberman's answers to EW's questions about the Lane County Animal Services/Greenhill Human Society Transition.

My understanding is that the county commission votes today (6/25) on the Greenhill contract with LCAS? Would Greenhill takeover July 1? 

I believe that the county commissioners voted yesterday to give permission to public works staff to enter into a contract when one is drafted.  We had our first contract meeting with Lane County today.  Everyone is still hopeful for a smooth transition on July 1st, but we still don’t have a contract drafted with Lane County.

How is the transition going? Will LCAS volunteers undergo Greenhill training? How much (if any) overlap will there be in things like running foster/volunteer programs? 

We are still in contract talks and working out details about the transition with all of the jurisdictions.  There is a lot to figure out. 

Greenhill’s goal is to ensure as smooth a transition as possible for the animals, and one thing that we have started, even without a contract in place is to begin meeting with the volunteers who have been helping the animals at LCAS.  We know that we will need everyone’s support and there are people eager to help.  We hope that the current LCAS volunteers will continue to volunteer.  Over time, we will wrap them into our training program, but because of the timing we won’t make that a pre-requisite to continue their volunteer activities.  Greenhill currently has two full-time employees who manage our volunteer and foster programs, and all staff are trained to work closely with volunteers.  We don’t anticipate the need to expand volunteer program management staff.

On if kittens with ringworm are being put down:

We have successfully treated many ringworm cases, and unfortunately there were some that we were not able to treat.  Ringworm is a challenging disease.  On one hand, it is often treatable if the animal is in a home environment and is otherwise healthy.  In a shelter environment, which is often more stressful and may be populated with a number of animals with compromised health, it spreads easily and is often considered untreatable in that environment.  At Greenhill, we look at it on a case-by-case basis.  In dogs, we generally consider it treatable.  For cats, it depends in large part on whether a foster home is available, and/or if there are other immune system or other serious concurrent disease concerns which would complicate treatment and make it less likely to be successful.

This disease in particular is one that we, and many shelters are trying to overcome.  Most recently, in 2010 the Dane County Humane Society in Madison, Wisconsin opened a 2,000 square foot, $400,000 ringworm treatment facility.  Until that time, they had a treatment program that was very similar to our own and relied in large part on foster families. http://www.maddiesfund.org/Resource_Library/Beating_Ringworm_in_Shelter_Cats.html We are hopeful that someday this community will support a similar construction project.

Is there a document with everything laid out about the Greenhill LCAS issue?

I know that the City of Eugene is working on a FAQ document regarding the transition and we are working on that with them.  I do not know if Lane County is working on something similar at this time.

June 29, 2012 03:32 PM

The Whimmers tried awfully hard to get a photo in before our Calendar deadline. Didn't make it, but the picture's cool, so on the blog we go!

(Hey local bands, send pics! We LIKE using cool, high res photos of you in the paper, send them to music@eugeneweekly.com)

The Whimmers: Friday June 29th. 10 pm at Luckey's. Over 21. 5 dollars at the door with special guests Stiff Peaks.

June 27, 2012 02:57 PM

This just in from Congressman Peter DeFazio's office as Lane County Jail reports it's releasing inmates due to budget cuts:

 

 

NEWS

FROM U.S. REPRESENTATIVE

PETER DeFAZIO

Fourth Congressional District, Oregon                                                                    June 27, 2012

Contact: Jen Gilbreath—(202) 225-6416                                                   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

*VIDEO AVAILABLE*

DEFAZIO ANNOUNCES ONE-YEAR EXTENSION OF COUNTY PAYMENTS

Provides rural Oregon counties with needed breathing room

 WASHINGTON, DC –Today, Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) announced that a temporary one-year extension of vital Secure Rural Schools Payments will be included in a final surface transportation conference bill. DeFazio has been involved in the joint House-Senate negotiations over a two-year surface transportation bill and successfully fought to include the temporary extension of county payments for Oregon counties.

“Recent county budget cuts have forced painful layoffs, eliminated jail beds releasing inmates early, and limited county sheriff’s ability to respond to rural emergencies. This temporary extension will provide much needed breathing room for forested communities in Oregon that are quickly approaching financial disaster.

“Ultimately our counties and rural communities need a long term solution – and this extension gives us the time we need to pass comprehensive federal legislation.  I have proposed a bipartisan agreement with Rep. Walden and Rep. Schrader that can break us out of the decades-long logjam on federal forest policy, put Oregonians back to work, improve forest health, and disentangle the health of rural counties from unpredictable federal support payments. We will continue to work with the House Resources Committee to move this long-term solution for Oregon forested communities,” DeFazio said.

The one-year extension designates just under $100 million for schools, roads, and law enforcement in failing rural counties in Oregon for the next fiscal year. 

BACKGROUND

In March, the Senate attached a one-year extension of Secure Rural Schools funding for forested counties nationwide to its two-year transportation bill (S 1813), Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21).  On April 18th, the House passed the Surface Transportation Extension Act of 2012, Part II (H.R. 4348).  This 90-day extension of the surface transportation programs through September 30, 2012, is the legislative vehicle the House used to conference with the Senate.  

Last fall, DeFazio, Walden, and Schrader worked with stakeholders to reach a bipartisan agreement on a long-term plan for the O&C counties. Since then, they’ve been working with the House Resources Committee to integrate the provisions of their proposal into larger committee legislation. Currently, House Resources is working out the details of the larger bill. A discussion draft was posted to the member’s websites in February where constituents can send feedback and suggest changes to the draft.

See DeFazio video statement pt 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZP30cysmCY

DeFazio video statement pt 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Hrc6lEjFBk

June 25, 2012 02:50 PM

Storm Large sings with Pink Martini July 1 at the Cuthbert as part of the Bach fest. Even though "(My Vagina is) Eight Miles Wide) is a Storm Large, not a Pink Martini tune, we at EW are hoping they play it anyway. You may want to use headphones to play this in your office. 

And below is a song more typical of Pink Martini. 

June 20, 2012 10:24 AM

This press release just in from the Eugene Police Department. Don't freak out when that Black Hawk helicopter flies overhead and lands on 22nd Avenue. It's all for the kids. You know, nothing says "promoting positive youth development" like a large military aircraft.

 

News Release

June 20, 2012

For further information, contact:

Paula Hunt, AIC Public Information Coordinator, at 541.682.5124, or

Jenna McCulley AIC, Public Information Director, at 541.682.5197

VISUAL/STORY OP: EPAL Campers have a special visitor today!

WHERE:  Eugene Police Activities League Camp (EPAL)

Arts and Technology Academy, 1650 W 22nd Avenue, Eugene

WHEN:   TODAY, June 20, 2012, at 12:00 p.m.

 

It's a bird...It's a plane...

NO, it's a UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter!

Don't miss this very special and awesome 'drop in' visitor from the Oregon Army National Guard!  In addition to today's regularly scheduled activities, todays EPAL campers will have the exciting honor to have a closer look at this amazing Helicopter and those who operate it.

The special visitor is scheduled to touch down today at 12:00 noon in the field behind the Arts and Technology Academy, 1650 West 22nd Ave.

The Oregon Army National Guard crewmembers are some of the best pilots around. They assist with ongoing search and rescue efforts as well as firefighting. These highly skilled crewmembers respond to hundreds of emergencies flying from Mount Hood, to Mount Jefferson and the Sisters.  They can hoist a climber from Mount Rainier at 13,500 feet, pull a drowning kayaker form the Sandy River or snag a lost child dangling above the rocky Oregon Coast.  It has been said that when flying a Blackhawk mission to service the community can be very similar to police work, "...you never know what you are walking (flying) into."

You don't have to be a kid to love this visit.  Come have a closer look yourselves!

As a reminder, EPAL is an annual day camp for youths between the ages of 8 and 13, offering a variety of activities, from competitive sports to arts.  EPAL provides educational and social skill development programs that will help students develop and build leadership skills.  EPAL is part of the National Police Activities League program, a non-profit organizations dedicated to promoting positive youth development.  This year's Eugene Police Activities League Camp (EPAL) runs from June 18 - 22.

June 17, 2012 11:42 AM

A disturbing video of horses at a rodeo in Oregon being roped by the legs in a practice called horse tripping and one bucking horse breaking its leg has been posted on YouTube. The Big Loop Rodeo in Jordon Valley, Ore. took place in May. The events were posted by SHowing Animals Respect & Kindness (SHARK).

The rodeo was apparently sponsored by Les Schwab Tire Centers and Idaho Power Company.  Les Schwab's Facebook page is already full of criticism.

SHARK writes: "In this video we focus on the horses roped, slammed to the ground, and sometimes dragged by the Jordan Valley Big Loop Rodeo's signature event, Big Loop horse roping."

The animal cruelty group says on its YouTube page that it has not received a response to its video and criticism by the Big Loop Rodeo.

Warning the video is graphic, especially in the first few minutes where the horse's broken leg is shown in slow motion, and again later when galloping horses are roped by the neck and legs and fall to the ground.

 

The rules for the Big Loop Event are posted here and say that

Stock must not be handled roughly at any time,
and ropers may be disqualified if in the opinion of the field judge
they have intentionally done so.
Any stock injury will result in immediate disqualification.

The Humane Society of the United States tried to ban the practice of horse tripping in the 2011 Oregon Legislature but the bill, Senate Bill 613, was killed in committee. At the time, bill opponent Dave Duquette of United Horsemen said:

"No rodeo event in Oregon condones, or conducts, horse tripping. Oregon has comprehensive laws in place to protect animals. This bill was totally unnecessary. It was nothing more than a first step by HSUS to ban all roping of all animals in our state," Dave Duquette, United Horsemen CEO and President, said.

"Horses are livestock, and if this bill had become law, it would have set the precedent for making it illegal to rope a cow. After all, they're both livestock - what's the difference between horses' legs and cows' legs?" he added.

However, the Big Loop Rodeo's signature event has long been the horse roping. Duquette is also known for his attempts to bring a horse slaughter plant back to Oregon.

June 16, 2012 11:28 AM

 Rolling Stone praises Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley in a blog post by writer Matt Taibbi. Taibbi writes about  J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon’s Senate testimony before the Senate banking committee and says he had an "inkling" it would be hard to watch but …

But I wasn’t prepared for just how bad it was. If not for Oregon’s Jeff Merkley, who was the only senator who understood the importance of taking the right tone with Dimon, the hearing would have been a total fiasco. Most of the rest of the senators not only supplicated before the blowdried banker like love-struck schoolgirls or hotel bellhops, they also almost all revealed themselves to be total ignoramuses with no grasp of the material they were supposed to be investigating.

Taibbi writes a scathing indictment of the meeting and the sentators "slavish" questioning of Dimon on derivative trading.

This was an opportunity to show Americans how a too-big-to-fail commercial bank like Chase – supported by vast amounts of public treasure, from Fed loans to bailouts to less obvious subsidies like GSE purchases of mortgages and implicit guarantees of bank debt – uses the crutch of government support to gamble recklessly in search of huge profits, with the public on the hook for any potential downside.

But he writes, instead, "Instead, they mostly cowered and cringed and sat mute with thumbs in their mouths, while Dimon evaded, patted himself on the back, and blew the whole derivative losses episode off as an irrelevant accident caused by moron subordinates."

 Jon Tester of Montana gets some credit for standing up for the farmers he represents, but mostly Taibbi's praise is reserved for Merkley who at one point when interrupted in his questioning by Dimon says, "Sir, this is not your hearing. You’re here to answer questions. And I only have five minutes."

For the full commentary, go to the Taibblog.

June 11, 2012 09:39 PM

Did you ever grow anything in the garden of your mind?

June 11, 2012 10:57 PM

First there were face-eating zombies. Now the plague.

Highlights from the press release below include "People should contact their health care provider if plague is suspected" and "Avoid sick or dead rodents, rabbits and squirrels, and their nests and burrows." No problem.

Probable Case of Human Plague in Crook County Resident


Crook County is reporting a probable case of human plague. The individual is being hospitalized. Contacts of this individual have been notified and are receiving preventive antibiotics. Plague cases are rare in Oregon. It is spread to humans or animals through a bite from an infected flea or by contact with an animal sick with the disease.

People can protect themselves, their family members and their pets by using flea treatments on your pets to prevent them from bringing fleas into your home.  Plague is serious but it is treatable with antibiotics if caught early. A domestic cat in Crook County tested positive for bubonic plague a year ago.

Only three human cases have been diagnosed in Oregon since 1995. According to Karen Yeargain, L.P.N., Communicable Disease Coordinator at the Crook County Health Department, the 1995 case was in a Deschutes County resident who was exposed to plague-infected fleas from household cats that hunted rodents in the fields. Two of three cats in that household also tested positive for plague exposure. In 2010, two human cases of plague were diagnosed in Lake County. Further investigation revealed that the family dog had also been exposed to plague. In 2011, an additional case with exposures in Lake County was diagnosed. There were no fatalities in humans or household animals in these cases. 

Symptoms of plague typically develop within one to four days after exposure and include fever, chills, headache, weakness and a bloody or watery cough due to infection. Three clinical syndromes have been described; bubonic (lymph node infection), septicemic (blood infection), and pneumonic (lung infection).   Bubonic plague is the most common form and is characterized by high temperatures, lethargy and swollen lymph nodes, most commonly in the neck and under the jaw. Infected lymph nodes may spontaneously abscess and drain. 

People should contact their health care provider if plague is suspected and a veterinarian if pets or other animals exhibit symptoms consistent with the plague.  Early treatment for pets and people with appropriate antibiotics is essential to curing plague infections. Untreated plague can be fatal for animals and people. Antibiotics to prevent or treat plague should be used only under the direction of a health care provider.

Plague can be passed from fleas feeding on infected wild mammals to pets such as cats and to their human owners. "To protect your pets, avoid allowing them access to areas with fleas or to other pets carrying fleas, and treat your pets for fleas to help prevent this disease," Yeargain said. "Call your local veterinarians for assistance in which products are safe for use in pets, because some treatments may be toxic to your pet."

Some additional steps to prevent flea bites are to wear insect repellant, tuck pant cuffs into socks when in areas heavily occupied by rodents, and avoid contact with wildlife including rodents. Pet owners are encouraged to keep cats indoors. Also, do not handle ill-appearing stray or wild animals.

Health authorities offer the following recommendations to prevent plague:

  • Avoid sick or dead rodents, rabbits and squirrels, and their nests and burrows.
  • Keep your pets from roaming and hunting.
  • Talk to your veterinarian about using an appropriate flea control product on your pets.
  • Clean up areas near the house where rodents could live, such as woodpiles, brush piles, junk and abandoned vehicles.
  • Sick pets should be examined promptly by a veterinarian.
  • See your doctor about any unexplained illness involving a sudden and severe fever.
  • Put hay, wood, and compost piles as far as possible from your home.
  • Don’t leave your pet’s food and water where mice can get to it.
  • Veterinarians and their staff are at higher risk and should take precautions when seeing suspect animal plague cases.

Source: Crook County, State Public Health Veterinarian

May 30, 2012 05:12 PM

If you haven't already heard about the face-eating zombie in Miami, then you're lucky. The details are gross. So I will balance out posting about that fascinating little tidbit with a little news item about UNICORNS. 

Over the weekend the Miami Herald reported that right outside its building a naked man was found eating another naked man's face. True story. They even got parts of it on security camera. 

That's right, the Miami Herald, not the Weekly World News, though rumors abound that this is the first sign of the zombie apocalypse.

I'm going to tell you right now, if you're squeamish, skip right down to the unicorns.

There's been a lot of speculation about just what caused Rudy Eugene to eat Ronald Poppo's face for 18 minutes — cocaine, LSD and bath salts are all options (the cops had a theory about these things "baking" you on the inside thus leading Eugene to get naked). Bath salts apparently don't make you smell good and relax in the tub (no, they make you eat people's faces off) rather they are some weird form of meth, or so says the National Institures of Health, which also warns:

… these products have been reported to trigger intense cravings not unlike those experienced by methamphetamine users … 

Right, intense cravings to eat someone's face. I'm going to skip ever trying bath salts as a pick-me-up and stick with caffeine.

Gory details: The Miami Herald reports (and again, I warned you):

"He had his face eaten down to his goatee. The forehead was just bone. No nose, no mouth," said Sgt. Armando Aguilar, president of the Miami Fraternal Order of Police. "In my opinion, he just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time."

Sgt. Javier Ortiz, vice president of the Miami Fraternal Order of Police, said it was one of the bloodiest "and goriest scenes I've ever been to."

"It was not only grotesque, it was just very sad, the amount of blood. It was very sad to see what happened to this gentleman that had his face eaten," Ortiz said.

And of course one unlucky dude happened to be cycling by:

Larry Vega was riding his bicycle off the causeway, which connects downtown Miami with Miami Beach, when he saw the attack.

"The guy was, like, tearing him to pieces with his mouth, so I told him, 'Get off!'" Vega told Miami television station WSVN (http://bit.ly/L6kwWt). "The guy just kept eating the other guy away, like, ripping his skin."

Vega flagged down the Miami police officer, who can be seen exiting his car on the Herald video. Vega said the officer repeatedly ordered the attacker to get off. Eugene just picked his head up and growled at the officer before continuing to maul his victim, Vega said.

The officer shot Eugene, but he just kept chewing, Vega said. The officer fired again, killing Eugene.

Now for UNICORNS.

Ok, well, I lied. It's really politics. CNN is reporting that a group satirizing "birthers" (those folks who still insist Obama is a damn foreigner) has asked Arizona to prove Mitt Romney is not a unicorn. 

Without such proof, the group Left Action argues with tongue in cheek, Romney may indeed be a unicorn -- his dark mane hiding a horn -- and therefore ineligible to be on the presidential ballot in November.

The group called Left Action says it has 19,000 emails already. 

May 26, 2012 10:33 PM

Portland actor Isaac Lamb proposed to his girlfriend on Wednesday. The video's already gone viral.  It's worth a watch — cute but not in the way that makes you wince. It makes you giggle.

And as long as we're on the topic. It's about to be June and that IS wedding season after all … Head's up, some of these are corny (you know, cute, but corny). And I can't help but to wonder how the heck are these guys so organized? Number 2 is the best one.

May 21, 2012 02:43 PM

 

A news story about how organic foods might make people act like jerks is making the internet rounds this week, with gems like this:

 "I stopped at a market to get a fruit platter for a movie night with friends but I couldn't find one so I asked the produce guy," says the 40-year-old arts administrator from Seattle. "And he was like, 'If you want fruit platters, go to Safeway. We're organic.' I finally bought a small cake and some strawberries and then at the check stand, the guy was like 'You didn't bring your own bag? I need to charge you if you didn't bring your own bag.' It was like a 'Portlandia skit.' They were so snotty and arrogant."

As it turns out, new research has determined that a judgmental attitude may just go hand in hand with exposure to organic foods. In fact, a new study published this week in the journal of Social Psychological and Personality Science, has found that organic food may just make people act a bit like jerks.

Also big in food news this week is "meat glue." Will it be the next pink slime?

Transglutaminase (TG or TGase), better known to chefs as “Meat Glue,” has the amazing ability to bond protein-containing foods together. Raw meats bound with TG are often strong enough to be handled as if they were whole uncut muscles. TG is safe, natural, and easy to use. In the kitchen, TG is primarily used to:

• Make uniform portions that cook evenly, look good, and reduce waste

• Bind meat mixtures like sausages without casings

• Make novel meat combinations like lamb and scallops

• Produce special effects like meat noodles, meat and vegetable pastas (using gelatin as a binder), etc. Additionally, TG can thicken egg yolks, strengthen dough mixtures, thicken dairy systems, and increase yield in tofu production, among other useful applications.

Umm, increase yield in TOFU production? Heads up hippies.