• Eugene Weekly Loves You!
Share |

EW! A Blog.

January 4, 2016 12:07 PM

The Oregonian and OPB have reporters on the scene of the Bundy occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Harney County Oregon, aka #VanillaISIS (let's note Daesh is more appropriate, but that doesn't hashtag as well). 

High Country News has been covering the "Sagebrush Rebellion" for 40 years. Scroll down to 1994 for an article on the Malheur refuge.

OPB's Amanda Peacher's tweet showing the Bundy militia's supplies is rather telling. Her Twitter feed is worth a follow for followers of the refuge takeover.

 

In comparison to the events in Oregon, reading up on the saga of the Shoshone Dann sisters of Nevada in their battle for land makes for an informative read. As the columnist for the Las Vegas Review-Journal points out, "The Danns had the support of the United Nations, but not the endorsement of armed 'patriots' or an outpouring of assistance from conservative media outlets and right-wing political action networks."

The Portland Audobon Society weighs in on the Harney County standoff, writing:

The occupation of Malheur by armed, out of state militia groups puts one of America’s most important wildlife refuges at risk. It violates the most basic principles of the Public Trust Doctrine and holds hostage public lands and public resources to serve the very narrow political agenda of the occupiers. The occupiers have used the flimsiest of pretexts to justify their actions—the conviction of two local ranchers in a case involving arson and poaching on public lands. Notably, neither the local community or the individuals convicted have requested or endorsed the occupation or the assistance of militia groups.

And the FBI is now involved.

FBI STATEMENT ON HARNEY COUNTY SITUATION
News Release from FBI - Oregon

The FBI is working with the Harney County Sheriff's Office, Oregon State Police and other local and state law enforcement agencies to bring a peaceful resolution to the situation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

The FBI is the lead investigative agency for the situation at the refuge.

Due to safety considerations for both those inside the refuge as well as the law enforcement officers involved, we will not be releasing any specifics with regards to the law enforcement response.

And below (click the image for the full document) is the summary of the court case that led the Hammonds to go to prison, and the Bundys to show up in rural Oregon. The acting U.S. attorney points out the government never called the Hammonds terrorists.

December 17, 2015 06:18 PM

Sources at the Eugene Register-Guard tell EW that an email went out on Dec. 17 informing R-G staffers that N. Christian Anderson III is no longer editor and publisher of the paper. Anderson started at the R-G June 1, after leaving The Oregonian. 

EW sent an email to Wendy Baker, director of human resources and general counsel at the R-G, to confirm and ask the reason for the change. 

In response, Baker wrote, "I would consider giving you a quote if you would share the source of your information."

EW does not reveal the identity of sources to whom we have promised confidentiality. 

Baker then wrote, "I'm sorry, but our policy is not to discuss personnel matters."

Longtime R-G arts and features reporter Randi Bjornstad, who is also with the Eugene Newspaper Guild, which represents the paper's employees, responded to a request for comment. She was not one of EW's original sources. Bjornstad says she was surprised to receive the email saying Anderson had been let go from the Register-Guard, and "I thought he was doing everything the company said it wanted, in terms of digital coverage."

Although the R-G has stepped up and altered its digital coverage, Anderson didn't appear to implement some of the more dramatic changes at the locally owned paper that he did at The O, which is owned by Advance Publications. Under Anderson, The O laid off staff, switched from a broadsheet to a tabloid format, went to four-day instead of seven-day home delivery to "reorganize operations" and "emphasize online news." 

Willamette Week has posted the text of the email from R-G chairman Tony Baker, the husband of Wendy Baker. The R-G is owned by the Baker family.

While Anderson was the first non-Baker to be the editor of the R-G, another outsider, David Pero was the paper's chief operating officer from 2007 to 2012, overseeing day-to-day operations of the paper, including "direct oversight of the newsroom." Pero swiftly departed the paper after five years, under rumors he had been fired.

You can read The O's account of Anderson here, or a more jaded account of his newspaper history published in 2010 on the Daily Kos or here at The Sockeye.

Anderson was listed as the editor and publisher of the R-G on the paper's masthead in the Thursday, Dec. 17 issue of the paper, but by the Dec. 18 edition, his name was gone. 

And here is the text of the email sent out 3:38 pm Dec. 17 to R-G employees that is now circulating on social media:

Dear Colleagues:

I'm writing to inform you that Chris Anderson is no longer Editor and Publisher of The Register-Guard.

For the immediate future, I will step back in and assume the responsibilities of president of Guard Publishing Company. I will be in the office building for a couple of hours each weekday to consult with department managers and others as needed. I will rely on those same managers to continue to lead their respective departments and carry out the media company strategic plan initiatives adopted by the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors at its September meeting. I will be out of the office beginning next week through the end of the year, returning to the office on Monday, January 4. In my absence, I have asked Rick Baker and Dave Baker to jointly assume operational direction of the company.

The Nominating and Succession Planning Committee, a standing committee of the Board of Directors, will meet and formally begin a search for new media company leadership in January. Meanwhile, I ask that everyone continue to focus on the vitally important work you do day in and day out to serve our readers and advertisers. They're counting on us not to miss a beat.

On behalf of the Baker family, I wish you and yours all the best this holiday season. Your commitment to The Register-Guard and your contributions to our continued success are deeply appreciated.

Sincerely,

Tony Baker
Chairman
Guard Publishing Company

December 16, 2015 05:25 PM

Thursday Dec. 17 at 10 am, a patch of forest outside of Eugene goes to auction. That patch of forest, called the John's Last Stand timber sale by the Bureau of Land Management, is near the Willamette  National Forest Hiking Trail and the Hardesty Mountain unroaded area.

Preserving the Hardesty wildlands complex, a little over 20 miles southwest of Eugene, has been a campaign of the Many Rivers Group Sierra Club for several years, and Many Rivers Group is protesting the sale along with Cascadia Wildlands and Oregon Wild.

According to the BLM's sale proposal, John's Last Stand  is being sold as a "regeneration harvest." Oregon Wild says the proposal calls for leaving only six to eight trees an acre — essentially a clearcut.

 

Oregon Wild says the forest is 116 years old and the clearcutting will be "just a stone's throw" from a hiking trail and in a roadless area close to Eugene. The Many Rivers Group says in its campaign to preserver Hardesty as a wild area that, "on the Umpqua side of the Hardesty divide is the headwaters for Cottage Grove's drinking water supply.

In their Dec. 3 protest letter to the Eugene BLM, the three groups write, "A large amount of clearcutting has occurred on private lands in this area in recent years. BLM should no add to the cumulative effects by conducing more regen, harvest which may have significant effects on water quality, wildlife habitat, and scenic values."

The groups have asked members of Oregon's congressional delegation, including Rep. Peter DeFazio, to halt the sale.  

December 10, 2015 04:47 PM

 New York Magazine has thrown a little attention Eugene's way with a piece called "Go Green in Eugene: The Willamette Valley city has become a hub for sustainable brewing, outdoor adventuring, and locally focused cooking."

Major points for only mentioning the UO and Ducks in the context of the art museusm, Ethos mag and the duck eggs served at Membrillo. 

Local readers may not agree with all the choices, but EW sure didn't mind that NY mag recommended folks pick up the local alt weekly:

But one big question we have is: Where in the world is that waterfall? Seems like that same image has been used in another visit Eugene article, and we're pretty sure it's not Eugene!

Update

We're hearing that the photo is from Silver Falls State Park. It's the same Getty image that The Daily Beast erroneously used in 2012 when it named Eugene a top green city. 

December 5, 2015 10:23 AM

A Nov. 27 notice mailed out by the U.S. Postal Service warns that if a "mailpiece" contains ads for marijuana it is "nonmailable."

 

This has some Oregon newspapers that accept legal pot ads concerned, particularly rural papers that are primarily mailed. According to The Oregonian, "It's not clear what prompted the warning, which was hand-delivered Monday by a Washington postal official to the Chinook Observer, a Long Beach, Wash., newspaper. The newspaper and the Daily Astorian distribute a weekly tab called Coast Weekend, which runs advertisements from a Long Beach dispensary and Oregon Coast dispensaries."

Members of Oregon's congressional delegation responded in a letter to the Postmaster, asking, among other things, if the policy is being enforced in all 50 states and what discretion a regional postmaster has, what authority does the Postal Service have to regulate the advertising of legal marijuana, if the ads aren't promising to mail any marijuana? How will the Postal Service enforce the rule when Congress prohibited the U.S. Department of Justice from spending any money prosecuting federal marijuana crimes in states that have legalized weed?

Finally, Ron Wyden, Jeff Merkley, Suzanne Bonamici and Earl Blumenauer ask if the Postal Service cooperateed “with anyone at DEA or DOJ in establishing this policy?" and if it did the “please detail the nature of the cooperation."

December 3, 2015 04:34 PM
Mayor Kitty Piercy sent out a statement on her health today. According to the news release, the mayor found a small, non-invasive cancer through a routine breast self-examination. 
 
Following the discovery of a lump in her breast and a subsequent mammogram and biopsy, Mayor Piercy’s doctor has diagnosed ductal carcinoma in situ. Her understanding is that this is a very common cancer that is small, non-invasive and low grade. Next week, Mayor Piercy will meet with a surgeon and make arrangements for surgery soon.
 
Mayor Piercy said, “I am grateful that this was discovered through routine breast self-examination. It is a reminder to us all to do those examinations regularly. Throughout this process I have been impressed with the kind, efficient and very professional care I have received. I expect to need a little time to recover from surgery, but other than that to continue with my usual full schedule.”
November 18, 2015 04:47 PM

On Friday Nov. 20, the UO's chapter of  Young American for Liberty is hosting a poker night on campus with raffle prizes of a two handguns and a rifle.

According to a Facebook event page, YAL believes the university's gun ban "puts students in danger." And the free poker night seeks to "spur a campus wide discussion on gun rights and the right to protect yourself on campus."

The page says, "This year, Oak Grove Gun Shop in Eugene donated a .40S&W Sig Sauer handgun. Mazama Gun Shop donated a Weatherby Vangaurd 243 Rifle with a Simmons Scope 3.5-10/40."

It later adds that a Bersa Thunder handgun is also a prize thanks to a donation from the Oregon Firearms Federation and Mazama Sporting Goods.

The page features a photo of the Sig Sauer and clarifies that because guns are not allowed on campus, "the transaction will take place off campus at a federally licensed firearms dealer and follow all state and federal regulations. They will never be brought to campus." 

YAL went before the Associated Students of the Unversity of Oregon to ask for funding for the event. Members "requested $950 to reserve the ballroom in the EMU and pizza at its five-hour event on Nov. 20," the Oregon Emerald reports, adding that the event is estimated to attract 200 students and last year about 90 attended.  The ASUO voted down the request.

In light of the recent killings at Umpqua Community College, the gun giveaway is causing an outcry on the event page and elsewhere on social media. In response to a Facebook post on the gun giveaway sahred by the UO's YAL chapter presidesnt, Thomas Tullis, on his Facebook page, that says "If you think the easiest way to get a gun in this country is by beating 200 other students in a poker tournament, then I challenge you to show up and win to prove how easy it is," one of his FB friends writes, "Surely you wouldn't be providing anyone with a gun who couldn't otherwise secure one. Just seems like a huge dick move in light of recent events."

The poker night and raffle take place 5 pm Friday, Nov. 20 at the EMU ballroom on the UO campus. 

November 6, 2015 02:35 PM

As President Obama heads toward his last year in office, he has been stepping up his actions on climate change. Today he he announced he has said no to the Keystone XL pipeline. Earlier this week, the State Department had turned down Canadian company TransCanada's request to delay government review of the pipeline, fueling speculations the Obama administration would reject it. 

According to TransCanada's Keystone website, the massive 1,179 mile oil pipline would not just transport oil from the Canadia tar sands, but "also support the significant growth of crude oil production in the United States from producers in the Bakken region of Montana and North Dakota."

The website says, "The pipeline will have capacity to transport up to 830,000 barrels of oil per day to Gulf Coast and Midwest refineries."

Obama said the pipeline would have "undercut" the U.S.'s global leadership on climate change. 

October 27, 2015 04:18 PM

A little Huffington Post poll shows Dems and Repubs disagreeing … and agreeing.

 

The Results Of This Poll Will Surprise You

We polled 60 Democrats and 60 Republicans on politically-charged questions. Check out how similar (and different) the two parties are.Video: Cut

Posted by The Huffington Post on Tuesday, October 27, 2015

October 23, 2015 03:22 PM

Call them crawdads, call them crayfish but whatever you call them, ringed crayfish are native to the central plains and Ozarks, not Oregon, and a recent discovery  of the invasive crayfish in Lane County's Row River new Cottage Grove is troubling biologists according to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

Non-native Ringed crayfish were recently discovered in the Willamette River drainage. Photo by ODFW.

The crayfish outcompete our native signal crayfish and ODFW thinks their presence is the result of an illegally released pet or crayfish used as bait by anglers.

Ringed crayfish are one of three species of crayfish that compete with signal crayfish for food, shelter and space. 

A full press release from ODW is below this helpful video discussing the differences between ringed and signal crayfish.

 

 

Discovery of invasive crayfish in the Willamette River drainage concerns biologists

SALEM, Ore – Ringed crayfish have successfully invaded many rivers and streams in southern Oregon, but were just found in Lane County’s Row River. This is the first discovery of this species in the Willamette River drainage.

“To find Ringed crayfish in the upper end of the Willamette Basin is very alarming to us,” said Jeff Ziller, South Willamette Watershed District Fish Biologist. “Ringed crayfish have been found to outcompete our native Signal crayfish  for habitat and food. The non-native ringed crayfish dominate the crayfish populations in the Rogue, Chetco and Umpqua rivers, so this is bad news for Signal crayfish here in the Willamette system.

While on a recreational dive in late September, a U.S. Forest Service employee discovered two Ringed crayfish below the falls at Wildwood Falls Park on the Row River. With assistance from the USFS, the Coast Fork Watershed Council, and student volunteers, ODFW biologists conducted a presence/absence survey by placing numerous crayfish traps below and above the initial discovery site and some tributaries of the Row River down into Dorena Reservoir.

Adult Ringed crayfish were found below the falls between the park and reservoir. Only native Signal crayfish were found in the Row River below Dorena Dam and in sampled tributaries including Mosby, Brice and Sharps creeks.

Rick Boatner’s experience with these invasive crayfish tells him they were possibly used by anglers as bait or were illegally released into the wild by someone who had them as a pet. Boatner is ODFW’s invasive species coordinator and said it’s illegal to use live, non-native crayfish as bait except in the waterbody in which they were taken. It is also illegal to release non-native crayfish into the wild.

Boatner asks people to report any findings of Ringed crayfish or other non-native crayfish to ODFW and to not return them to the waterway. To report sightings of invasive species, call 1-866-INVADER or report it online at http://oregoninvasiveshotline.org or call ODFW at 503-947-6308.

Native Signal crayfish have smooth claws with a white “signal” spot on claw pivot and a wide body plate on the back. Learn more about crayfish here.

 

 

 

 

 

October 16, 2015 01:14 PM

Sometimes talking about beaver can be awkward. Especially when it involves puppets. 

Oregon State is crowdsourcing the beaver genome project, donate and support a dam good cause.

 

October 16, 2015 12:36 PM

The anti-LNG groups that recently brought you a paper maché Gov. Kate Brown are heading to Salem to protest liquified natural gas pipeline and export projects slated for Oregon's lands and waters. Press release is below.

Photo credit: Rising Tide

Raging Grannies & Youth to Hold Intergenerational Protest Against LNG at Capitol

On Monday, October 19 at 10:30am, an intergenerational group of grandmothers and youth will hold a protest at the Oregon State Capitol building in Salem. The protest will call on Governor Brown to oppose Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) pipelines and export projects.

Scores of concerned Oregonians from around the state are expected to join the crowd, including activists and from the Raging Grannies of Oregon, 350.org Eugene, Southern Oregon Rising Tide and Cascadia Forest Defenders. They will use spectacle, theater, song and a rally in an appeal to Kate Brown, asking her to use her powers as Governor to oppose the Pacific Connector Pipeline as Governor Kulongowski did in 2010.

The event follows Portland Rising Tide’s 10/14 demonstration in Portland, when a papier mache Kate Brown delivered a notice of eviction to Federal Energy Regulatory Commission offices (story here) and Southern Oregon Rising Tide’s interruption of Congressmen Wyden and Merkley’s 10/14 appearance in Medford (story here).

Uniting across generations, the Monday protest will emphasize the breadth and diversity of those urging Governor Brown to take action against the LNG pipeline. It will also highlight the intergenerational threat the LNG export project would pose as the largest emitter of climate pollution in the state, as well as the national consequences of expanding fracked gas infrastructure.

October 3, 2015 12:37 PM

The Douglas County Sheriff's Office has issued this statement from the shooter's family: "We are shocked and deeply saddened by the horrific events that unfolded on Thursday, October 1. Our thoughts, our hearts and our prayers go out to all of the families of those who died and were injured. "

October 2, 2015 03:32 PM

The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office released the names today of those who were killed in the Oct. 1 shooting at Umpqua Community College.

Officials identified them as Lucero Alcaraz of Roseburg, 19, Quinn Glen Cooper of Roseburg, 18, Kim Saltmarsh Dietz of Roseburg, 59, Lucas Eibel of Roseburg, 18, Jason Dale Johnson of Winston, 34, Lawrence Levine of Glide, 67, Sarena Dawn Moore of Myrtle Creek, 44, Treven Taylor Anspach of Sutherlin, 20, and Rebecka Ann Carnes of Myrtle Creek, 18.

It appears most of those killed were students at the college. Larry Levine was an instructor.

The sheriff’s office says that nine other people were injured, not seven as originally believed. The death toll is 10 people, including the shooter, Chris Harper Mercer. The Douglas County sheriff is among some of the many people and groups who will not mention him by name as part of an effort to decrease copycat killings and the motivating factor of fame.

The school has cancelled classes for next week and President Obama has ordered flags to be flown at half staff.

It has been put out that the Westboro Baptist Church plans to picket the funerals of the victims. A Facebook group has formed to bring together community members working to prevent that and to shield and aid the families.

UCC student Chris Mintz has received acclaim after his family told the media that he was shot while charging the shooter. 

The sheriff's office also released family statements on behalf of several of those killed.

Jason Johnson Family Statement

"Jason Johnson, age 34, was proud to be a Christian. Jason recently enrolled in school at Umpqua Community College. Jason's mother said that Jason was proud of himself for enrolling in school, and so was his mom. They felt that Jason had finally found his path. His family says that he will be loved and missed."

 

Lucas Eibel Family Statement

"We have been trying to figure out how to tell everyone how amazing Lucas was, but that would take 18 years.

Lucas loved Future Farmers of America volunteering at Wildlife Safari, and Saving Grace animal shelter. He was an amazing soccer player. He graduated Roseburg High School with high academic marks. He was a Ford Family Foundation scholarship recipient. He was a Umpqua Community College scholars award recipient. He was studying chemistry.

Memorial donations can be made to Roseburg High School FFA and to the injured victims."

Quinn Cooper Family Statement

"We are in shock this happened. Quinn was only 18 years old. He just graduated in June from Roseburg High school. Yesterday was his fourth day of college. Quinn was funny, sweet, compassionate and such a wonderful loving person. He always stood up for people. Quinn and his brother Cody are inseparable. Quinn was going to take his brown belt test on October 10th. He loved dancing and voice acting and playing Ingress with Cody, my oldest son. I don't know how we are going to move forward with our lives without Quinn. Our lives are shattered beyond repair. We send our condolences to all the families who have been so tragically affected by this deranged gunman. No one should ever have to feel the pain we are feeling.

We are hearing so many people talk about gun control and taking people's guns away. If the public couldn't have guns it wouldn't help since sick people like this will always be able to get their hands on a gun(s). We need to be able to protect ourselves as a community and as a nation. Please don't let this horrible act of insanity become about who should or shouldn't have a gun. Please remember the victims and their families. Please remember Quinn."

Thank you. The Coopers.

Treven Anspach Family Statement

"The Anspach family would like to thank everybody for their heart felt thoughts and prayers during this most difficult time. Treven was one of the most positive young man always looking for the best in life. Treven was larger than life and brought out the best in those around him.

In Justin's and Kim's words Treven was a perfect son."