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March 13, 2013 04:44 PM

Tired of those Harlem Shake memes (and the misunderstanding of what the Harlem Shake is)?

So are the cops in Portland. They've made a public service announcement asking you to stop. It's kind of realistic right until the part where the white-guy shaker puts his hands behind his back almost before the cops has his cuffs out, but maybe it's doubling as a "how to get arrested" PSA. 

Eugene Police Department: You have been out-memed. Time to step it up. 

H/T Willamette Week.

March 13, 2013 05:05 PM

Are Occupy flyers banned at the library? Is there just a simple misunderstanding about bulletin board policy at the Eugene Public Library?  According to a emailed letter from activist Alley Valkyrie to Lavena Nohrenberg customer experience manager at the library, there might be an  issue with free speech and the library's bulletin board.

The letter is below:

 

Last Sunday, a local activist named Jana Thrift who is involved with the Nuclear Justice events taking place this week tried to hang a flyer on the notice board inside the library towards the front near the elevators. A security guard approached her, a woman with long curly black hair, and told Jana that she could not hang the flyer and it is the library's policy not to allow anything "Occupy-related" to be posted anywhere on library property. When Jana asked why Occupy flyers weren't allowed, the security guard stated that they considered all Occupy flyers "graffiti" and then started to talk about the "sidewalk chalk graffiti" on city sidewalks, and that if anyone had a problem with the policy, to "take it up with the library staff". 

As everyone who in a position of authority on this matter is well aware, the Library is publicly funded. Once a publicly funded library opens a space for public messaging such as the notice board in question, that space becomes a constitutionally-protected public forum under federal law. The library is obviously aware of this to some extent, as the sign that is currently hanging on the board states the following: "Eugene Public Library is not responsible for the contents of this board, but will remove items that are duplicates or that do not constitute legally protected speech." 

The flyer in question undoubtedly constitutes legally protected speech, and the Library has no right to prohibit such a flyer. While certain regulations are allowed in public forums, those regulations need to be content-neutral, and a policy that prohibits flyers on the basis of content is impermissible and unconstitutional save for a "compelling interest" on the part of the City. If the library has such a policy, whether written or verbal, it is undoubtedly in violation of the First Amendment, and I speak for many in the local activist community when I say that this situation concerns us greatly. 

It also needs to be pointed out for the record that the security guard's reasoning for prohibiting Jana from posting the flyer is based on factual inconsistencies. First off, the event that Jana attempted to post a flyer about isn't even an Occupy event, strictly speaking. It is an event that is co-coordinated by several non-profits in town, including CALC, Our Islands Conservation Center, the University of Oregon's Survival Center, as well as Occupy Eugene. 

Second, the vast majority of the "sidewalk chalk graffiti" throughout downtown Eugene is not done by nor has anything to do with Occupy Eugene. I take personal responsibility for most of the chalking downtown, and I don't do it on behalf of Occupy Eugene or any other group. I have initiated multiple discussions with the Eugene Police Department around chalking on public sidewalks over the past two years, and overall the police agree with my view that expressive messages written with sidewalk chalk does not constitute "graffiti" and is a constitutionally-protected exercise. If the Library believes that my chalking is graffiti, by all means notify the police and I will discuss it with them once more. But there is no connection whatsoever between the flyers that Jana tried to post and the chalk that occasionally appears on the sidewalks outside the library, and for the security guard to use my chalking as a justification for Jana not being able to hang a flyer is simply absurd.

I am hoping that what happened last Sunday was a result of either poor communication and/or a misunderstanding between library staff and security, or an instance where the security guard simply abused her authority for questionable reasons. If there is a Eugene Public Library policy that does prohibit any flyers from Occupy, I would appreciate a copy of the policy in writing as well as an explanation from the City Attorney as to why the City believes that such a policy is legally justifiable.

I await your reply, and I am hoping that this situation can be easily resolved.

Thank you,

Alley Valkyrie

March 11, 2013 01:25 PM

It's sort of "We are the World" for anti-fracking. With lyrics like "We can't afford for the world to get hotter/and we can't afford poly-nuclear-aromatic-hydrocarbons in our water" and "Now hold up kid, listen if you will/You can't tell a man where to stuck his drill" (the latter lyric sung by the bad fracker, of course) Sean Lennon and Yoko Ono enlist everyone from Fred Armisen of Portlandia to Susan Sarandon to playfully jump in and sing "Don't frack my Mother."

The video also features Carrie Fisher, Liv Tyler, members of Wilco and the Strokes. More info at Artists Against Fracking.

H/T to the Earth First! Newswire.

March 7, 2013 06:15 PM

As we reported in this week's EW.

When it comes to saving the environment, lawyers and protesters often go hand in hand, so it may come as no surprise that alongside (though not an official part of) the Public Interest Environmental Law Conference at the UO Feb. 28 to March 3, there were acts of protest.

The annual Outlaw Bash party and fundraiser tradition, as described by longtime environmentalist Michael Donnelly in an article inCounterPunch, is “music, libations and ever-popular bonfires of mock-ups of eco-destruction.” This year’s effigy burned in the fire featured Secretary of State Kate Brown and Gov. John Kitzhaber on their knees praying before a massive chainsaw emblazoned with “salvation” on one side and “Christihl” on the other (Stihl is a popular brand of chainsaw). 

The effigy was a comment on Kitzhaber and Brown’s presence on the State Land Board that governs Oregon’s state forests and their vote to dramatically increase clearcut logging on the forests. The Elliott State Forest is home to some of Oregon’s last coastal rainforests, and it houses threatened and endangered species, such as the marbled murrelett.

But they do say a picture is worth a thousand words …

"Kitzhaber" and "Brown," paying homage to the mighty chainsaw (the gov's boots and 'stache are a nice touch)

Close up of "Kate Brown" and a random beer

Burning like a forest fire …

March 5, 2013 08:22 PM

Protesters take over Franklin Boulevard.

The Cascadia Forest Defenders, Deep Green Resistance and other groups held an "action against extraction" on Sunday, March 3, following the Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, to call attention to global-warming inducing tar sands pipelines, fracking, coal exports and other damaging fossil-fuel projects. More in this week's EW.

 

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February 25, 2013 06:50 PM

Insect control made awesome. According to Oregon State University in Corvallis, "Trissolcus halyomorphae is a parasitoid wasp found in the native regions of BMSB (China, Korea, and Japan). It deposits eggs into the eggs of BMSB, where its larvae develop and kill the BMSB egg. A single adult wasp then emerges. Research is currently being done to evaluate this wasp as potential biological control agent of BMSB in the United States."

Mostly I just liked that it was bug reproduction set to cool music.

According to YouTube:

The video by Chris Hedstrom, a graduate research assistant at Oregon State University, showcases the life cycle of Trissolcus halyomorphae, an egg parasitoid of the brown marmorated stink bug, from mating to the emergence of the adult wasp from the host egg.

February 25, 2013 08:30 PM

More fun than mocking the Oscars: Watching Michelle Obama and Jimmy Fallon "Mom Dance."

Even better, given the slashes in school budgets to phys ed, the video helps draw attention to Obama's work on her Let's Move campaign for healther kids. Not only can the First Lady not  dance badly, shealso  invited Big Bird to the White House

February 22, 2013 06:24 PM

Lane County plans an animal services update at its Tuesday Feb. 26 meeting: 

>B. ORDER 13-02-26-10/ In the Matter of Confirming the Appointment of Dr. Duwayne Penfold and Approving the At-Large Appointments of Tamara Banavige and Jessica Berg as Members of the Lane County Animal Services Advisory Committee. (Mike Russell, Manager) (estimated 15 minutes)   (view material)

C. DISCUSSION/ In the Matter of the Status of the Lane County Animal Servicess Program and Update on Transition Issues. (Mike Russell, Manager) (estimated 30 minutes) (view material)

You can view the material via the agenda here. 
February 14, 2013 04:12 PM

A big ruling for the Western Environmental Law Center: WELC, which has offices in Eugene, succesfully argued the that the Bureau of Land Mangement can't keep secret the names of corporations that want to lease public lands to drill for oil and gas. “Every community has the right to know what corporations are seeking to drill on public lands near their homes and where they recreate,”  WELC attorney Kyle Tisde said. The press release is below.

Federal Agency Ordered to Reveal Identity of Corporations Seeking to Lease Public Lands for Oil & Gas Drilling

 

Court reverses BLM policy of keeping the nominators’ identity secret until after the lease sale

February 14, 2013

DENVER - A federal court ruled yesterday that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) policy and practice of keeping secret from the public the identity of entities nominating public lands for oil and gas development is unlawful.

The precedent setting ruling stems from a lawsuit filed in June 2012 by the non-profit organizations Citizens for a Healthy Community (CHC) and the Western Environmental Law Center (WELC).  The groups filed the suit after the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) refused to reveal names of the entities that had nominated 30,000 acres of public lands in Colorado’s North Fork Valley for oil and gas drilling.  

“Every community has the right to know what corporations are seeking to drill on public lands near their homes and where they recreate,” said WELC attorney Kyle Tisdel. “The Court’s decision is a clear rebuke of BLM’s policy to protect industry at the expense of the public and its ability to fully engage the agency’s decisionmaking process.”

Federal oil and gas leases are issued pursuant to competitive bidding at a public sale, which is the final step in a process that starts with the submission of an expression of interest (EOI). Until now, BLM policy has allowed the identity of EOI submitters to remain secret until after the lease sale – depriving the public from participating in BLM’s oil and gas drilling decision-making on a fully informed basis.

U.S. District Court Senior Judge Richard P. Matsch rejected the government’s contention that revealing the names of the nominators would give their competitors an unfair advantage and emphasized that the identity of the nominators is important information for citizens concerned about potential contamination of their water and air during the oil and gas extraction process.

“That contention runs directly contrary to the purpose of the public sale process. Competition in bidding advances the purpose of getting a fair price for a lease of publicly owned minerals,” Judge Matsch wrote. “Moreover, the identity of the submitter may be relevant to the plaintiff and others who may raise concerns about the stewardship records of that potential owner, a factor relevant to the environmental impact of the proposed sale.”

“This is a victory for everyone who believes the government should do its business in the open, and for everyone trying to protect their community from the severe impacts of oil and gas drilling,” said Jim Ramey, director of CHC. “The public has a right to know who nominated these leases, and we look forward to receiving that information from the BLM.”

The BLM announced in December 2011 that 30,000 acres of public lands in the North Fork Valley had been nominated for oil and gas leasing and development. The nominated parcels were included in the BLM’s August 2012 oil and gas lease sale; however, due to overwhelming public opposition spearheaded by CHC and WELC, BLM has twice deferred the lease of these parcels, most recently on February 6, 2013.

Western Colorado’s North Fork Valley is home to the largest concentration of organic farms in the Rocky Mountain West, and also home to West Elks American Viticultural Area’a 12 wineries. The region’s still growing sustainable local economy had been threatened by the nominated BLM leases.

Read a copy of the ruling here: http://www.westernlaw.org/sites/default/files/FOIA_Order.pdf

February 7, 2013 06:33 PM

Despite extensive objections from Oregon's vegetable seed growers who fear canola, aka rapeseed, will contaminate their crops, the Oregon Department of Agriculture has approved "some canola production in the Willamette Valley." The press release is below.

ODA adopts Willamette Valley canola control area rule

February 7, 2013... The Oregon Department of Agriculture has adopted an administrative rule that allows for some canola production in the Willamette Valley while continuing to protect specialty seed crop production. Under the rule, a majority of specialty seed production remains in a rapeseed exclusion zone in which canola is not allowed to be grown.

“Following the extensive amount of public comments received, we have made modifications to what was proposed in order to give greater assurance that our specialty seed growers in the Willamette Valley are not harmed by canola production,” says ODA Director Katy Coba. “At the same time, we feel it’s important to give some producers an opportunity to grow canola under the restrictions and safeguards put in place by this rule.”

The administrative rule establishes the Willamette Valley protected district, which includes portions of Lane, Linn, Benton, Marion, Polk, Clackamas, Yamhill, Washington, Multnomah, and Columbia counties. The protected district will have two zones. The first is a fully protected zone of more than 1.9 million acres that prohibits the growing of canola and contains the highest concentration of specialty seed growers in the valley. The second zone of about 1.7 million acres, located outside the exclusion zone, allows the growing of canola but production is limited to a maximum annual total of 2,500 acres. Producers desiring to grow canola are required to apply for a contract with ODA that contains specific requirements for managing the crop. The rule also establishes a minimum field size of 25 acres for canola.

In general, ODA’s rule limits how much canola can be grown in the Willamette Valley, where it can be grown, and requires significant management practices for production by controlling inadvertent spread of canola seed. It is important to note that the cap of 2,500 acres is a small fraction– just 0.13 percent– of the approximately 1.9 million acres of farmable land in the valley.

The rule and its new boundaries go into effect immediately. ODA will award contracts for canola planting by September 1 of each year for requests received before July 15. Each contract will describe the responsibilities and obligations of the producer.

For more information, go to http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/Pages/canola.aspx

February 7, 2013 05:33 PM

Four and half year old Fela Colbert has gone missing, and her father, Steve, is desperately trying to find out what happened. Colbert says when he went to pick Fela up from her mother, Deanna Lane, at the end of January at their weekly exchange location — the Eugene downtown public library — neither Fela nor her mother was there.

Colbert says he and Lane have joint parenting of Fela, but her mother has sole custody. Colbert says that in Oregon parents can get joint custody only if both parents agree to it. If one parent objects, the courts don't give joint custody. 

Colbert says the fact that Fela's mother has custody has made it difficult for him to get help  from law enforcement in tracking his daughter down. He says he is worried not just about his daughter, but about Lane. When he went to their house to find them, he says the landlord told him Lane had walked away with just a suitcase and left all her other belongings behind. She told the landlord she was moving because she felt threatened. Colbert says it's not just that his daughter is missing, with her mother gone too, it's a  "missing persons problem."

"It's a child, " he says, "If there's a 4 1/2-year-old girl missing, you do everything you can to find her."  And he says under the agreements made through the courts, Lane is supposed to give 30 days notice if she moves, and Colbert  the same, "even if you are just moving into the house next door."

Colbert says he has filed a report with The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and talked to the police. He doesn't know where his daughter is and is frantic to find her. 

For more information or to see where report a sighting, go to the Facebook page.

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Fela Khepri Colbert

February 4, 2013 11:32 AM

Kai the homeless hitchhiker saves a woman by whacking with an hatchet a driver who thinks he's Jesus and has just rammed his car into an electric company worker because the PG&E worker is black. 

True story. It happened in Fresno.

 

"He's like you know what, I've come to realize I'm Jesus Christ and I can do anything I want to."

"I grabbed the hatchet and I was like smash, smash, SMASH."

The PG&E worker is going to be ok; he has a broken leg. The driver is in jail, charged with attempted murder. Not sure where the hitchhiker wound up, but if he makes his way to Eugene (chances are good) then I say someone should buy him a drink.

January 31, 2013 03:06 PM

Trains can be dangerous so be careful. Also, because this disturbingly adorable little warning video out of Australia features a song that will get stuck in your head. 

Not to be outdone, the Safety Council of Australia would like you to drive more slowly.

January 30, 2013 01:32 PM

The recent fights over access to downtown Eugene's traditional public forums — the Wayne Morse Free Speech Plaza and the federal building plaza — are headed for the courts to debate the constitutionality of telling protesters that their free speech is limited to certain hours of the day. Tuesday marked a skirmish in the battle as activist Alley Valkyrie again tested the bounds of the exclusion order put on her by County Administrator Liane Richardson and County Counsel Stephen Dingle that is intended to keep her out of county buildings after she was charged (not convicted) of trespass for staying in the Free Speech Plaza after it was closed. 

Mayor Kitty Piercy has told Valkyrie and county staff that Valkyrie can come to city meetings, but in emails back and forth with Valkyrie, Dingle has maintained that she will be arrested if she enters the building without written permission and an escort. In an email written after Valkyrie attended a "name-clearing hearing" for former county attorney Marc Kardell, Dingle wrote:

I want to make sure that you understand that your presence at the Marc Kardell name clearing hearing did not result in your arrest for trespass because of a miscommunication.  Specifically, I want to make sure that you understand this is not a waiver of the previously imposed exclusion order. I have now had the opportunity to check with the City of Eugene regarding the assertions you made in your last email and  I learned nothing that would change the County’s position.  If you are present in the Public Service Building or Harris Hall for County functions without specific written permission from either the County Administrative Officer or County Counsel you will be subject to arrest.

Lane County does not have the resources to provide an escort. You may continue to enter the PSB or Harris Hall for city-related business as outlined in my earlier email.

In a return email, Valkyrie pointed out the irony of the county not having the resources for an escort while at the same time proposing giving Dingle a "huge" raise (the proposd 14 percent raise that has been declined for now would have taken Dingle's salary from $145,995 to $166,400).

On Jan. 29, Valkyrie attended a County Commission meeting to give public comment. 

Filmed by Joe Tyndall, edited by Dustin Ross

After the public comment period ends, commissioners can respond to the commenters. Commissioner Faye Stewart responded to a constiuent who had concerns over a flooded roadway and to Dexter resident Pam Driscoll who discussed mining at Parvin Butte, the firing of Kardell, and concerns about the county's participation in the Association of O&C Counties and its recent problematic use of "executive session." Commissioner Pat Farr commented briefly on the the AOCC issue.

Commissioner Pete Sorenson addressed Valkyrie's remarks and said that "Every government in our country has a responsibility to allow people who want to peaceably assemble and speak to do that" and that it was a protected right under the state and federal constitutions. He said it was important for elected officials to respect the right of people to speak out.

Commissioner Jay Bozievich told Valkyrie, "We did recognize who you were and allowed you to stay and speak because we don't want to limit your rights," adding, " That is not the intent of the order." Then he gave the example of the state Legislature and said, "There are time, place, manner, restrictions to some free speech to allow goverment functions to continue," and said Valkyrie can address the board when she wishes to in the future. 

To see the full remarks go here and click on the Jan. 29 HACSA meeting.