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Calendar Feature

July 28, 2016

The Springfield Farmers Market is now located outdoors, and to mark the move back into the sunshine they’re hosting a summer celebration with crafts, kids activities, food and prizes. Jim Crabb and Friends will play from 5-7pm. Purchases support local farmers who sell meats, local produce and baked goodies, and local art will also be for sale at the market. The market is open year-round so you can pick up fresh produce during any season. 

July 21, 2016

Just when you thought you were wearing your grownup pants, mobile game company Niantic Inc. dropped Pokémon Go in our collective lap. Pokémon Go, an addictive cell phone app, has forced people outdoors to go on a virtual animal hybrid chase, and this week you can bring your friends and your phones and be part of a pubcrawl to trap your favorite animated creatures. Don’t forget to name a designated driver, who should also double as a sober walker to make sure you can safely navigate downtown on foot while launching Poké balls. 

July 21, 2016

When the musicians of Samba Ja fill Kesey Square with Afro-Brazilian percussion, they are welcoming dancers, acrobats, clowns, jugglers, to join them at the Third Thursday Thircus. The band’s practices are open to the public, so if you want to learn their songs, you can join Samba Ja’s performances. The 15-piece plus ensemble brings the beats of Carnival and old-school hip hop around Eugene and at events like the Oregon Country Fair and the Olympic Trials. Bring your dancing shoes or a hula hoop. 

July 14, 2016

It’s a bird, it’s a plane … actually it is a plane, a plane performing aerial acrobatics, aka aerobatics, at the Corvallis Corkscrew this weekend at the Corvallis Municipal Airport. Aerobatics are the sort of maneuvers you might see at an airshow — flying upside down, rolls, turns, spins and tailslides — but the more than 30 pilots coming to show their stuff in Corvallis will be there to compete in precision flying. Think of aerobatics competitions as something like figure skating with competitors judged on symmetry and level of difficulty.

July 14, 2016

Though some hangers-on might still be lost in the woods, Oregon Country Fair is technically over. Before you waste any time showering and getting your life back in order, though, don’t forget The Lane County Fair is set the begin Wednesday. Deep fried sugar, rigged carnival games, braying livestock, washed-up rock bands and bone-rattling carnival rides of dubious integrity: The Lane County Fair is simultaneously the best of times and the worst of times. Life’s pressing responsibilities can wait another week, we hope.

July 7, 2016

Where once there was merely a KISS Army (the name for KISS’ official fanclub), there seems to have grown a KISS Industrial Complex. KISS, now more than 40 years running, is thought to be the most successful band in rock history when it comes to merchandising.

July 7, 2016

The world lost an amazing artist a few months ago, when Newport-born Rick Bartow died at age 69. Bartow relied on graphite, acrylic paints, woodworking tools and more to convey things known, but unexplainable. His creations — hanging in galleries and museums around the country, including the Smithsonian and, for a time, the White House — are sometimes playful and vivid, and other times tormented half animal, half man mutations with flashing white teeth and wild pain in their eyes.

June 30, 2016

Some of the world’s speediest runners, springiest jumpers and throwiest throwers compete this week in Eugene at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials. Beginning Friday at Hayward Field, America’s track stars will give it their sweatiest all to see if they have what it takes to bring home Olympic gold medals from Brazil this summer.

2016 U.S. Olympic Team Trials: Track and Field run July 1-10 at Hayward Field, at UO; Ticket prices vary, see usatf.org for more information.

June 30, 2016

Ken is funny, successful and smart. And he wants to die. Left paralyzed after a car accident and dependent on medical support systems, he is disinclined to wallow among beeping, sanitized hospital equipment. Ken chooses death. The rub, in this particular case, is that he’s not allowed to. This is the story of Whose Life Is It Anyway?, which opens Friday at the Very Little Theater. For VLT director Cindy Solari, the plot line of this play is more than just speculation.

June 23, 2016

“Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?” Yes, the Black Sheep Gathering — this weekend at the Lane County Fairgrounds June 24-26 — has a lot of wool. The gathering, in its 42nd incarnation, will feature 600 sheep, more than 120 vendors and hundreds of fleeces, according to Wayne Thompson a local sheep grower and BSG organizer. It’s a “sheep-to-shawl” show, Thompson says, with hundreds of sheep, goats and alpacas and a huge marketplace. The BSG will also host workshops on sheep-friendly topics such as wool-dyeing, spinning and felting.

June 23, 2016

Kids love Disney’s take on Hans Christian Andersen’s fairytale The Little Mermaid, a story in which a teenaged fish-girl trades away her voice for the chance to fall in love with a handsome rich kid. She’s got three days to make a prince fall in love with her, or a sea witch will turn her into a sentient sea vegetable. Boiled down, it sounds kinda messed up. But the songs are catchy and the characters are endearing. Plus, everything works out in the end, more or less.

June 16, 2016

Comedian Susan Rice got her comedy-feet wet performing at the Leaky Roof in Portland in 1983. The ’80s were kind to stand up comics, and Rice decided early on to take a stab at a career in comedy. After more than 30 years doing stand up, the seasoned comic is only getting funnier. A recent profile piece in Willamette Week describes Rice as a beloved fixture of Portland's growing comedy scene, who supports young talent and is revered by many performers as one of the city’s funniest people.

June 16, 2016

Remember fun? Somewhere along the way we lost our ability to have it. Shit, we may even have forgotten how. Every chance we get, we nail up bright yellow diamond-shaped signs to remind each other of the inherent mortal danger lurking in traditionally fun places, like playgrounds and beaches. The message: fun is bad for you. In school we’re forced to watch health class videos that reprogram us to think in terms of death and disease at the mention of sex. And when we hear loud music we begin to panic about the damage it’s doing our eardrums. Enough is enough.

June 9, 2016

This spring, UO assistant professor Rick Silva instructed students in his action sports filmmaking class, Stoked 101, to think “beyond the GoPro.” What they came back with may surprise you. Silva and his students plan to screen the results Friday, June 10, at the UO’s Outdoor Program Barn. The films featured in Stoked 101 vary in scope and tone, ranging from a documentary about a local fly fisherman to a mockumentary about competitive Slip’N Slide athletes. 

June 9, 2016

Heshers get no respect. Members of polite society will always see fans of heavy metal music as wastes of human potential, derailed in their teen years by the pull of cheap booze, dirty drugs, bad sex and Satanism. But I’ve always admired them as a kind of scorned monastic order. What's more, I'm intrigued by what appears to be their monomaniacal quest for Earth’s most excruciating sounds. Their savage and vulgar sensibilities completely reject the clean and predictable stupidity of pop music.

June 2, 2016

Rolling Stone sent Portland-based writer Donnell Alexander to Burns, Oregon, earlier this year to get a read on the Ammon and Ryan Bundy-led occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Harney County. “Even in Portland, I stand out," Alexander writes. "And now I'm more than 100 miles beyond cell phone range, and I feel like a sitting black duck." Early Oregonians did their absolute worst to keep black people from settling here, and to large extent, they succeeded.

June 2, 2016

The WOW Hall building is almost 85 years old. Can it withstand the perfect storm of noise and chaos coming its way? Portland’s sweaty bedazzeling nightmare circus marching band, MarchFourth, performs Friday with Eugene’s own High Step Society. Fans know you can't discuss MarchFourth and High Step Society in terms of decibels alone. To convey the intensity and spirit of these two bands, you need to resort to the Richter scale.

MarchFourth and High Step Society perform 9pm Friday, June 3, at WOW Hall, 291 W. 8th Ave.; $15-$18.

June 2, 2016

Don’t call it a comeback. For years now, audiophiles have been stoked to see records making a return, but the truth is vinyl never really went away. As more and more people turned to hollow-sounding compressed digital audio files and frustratingly incomplete online music streaming services, purists clung ever tightly to their bulky record collections. Though some never gave up hope, a new generation is discovering the priceless joy of listening to its favorite songs on LP. Fortune magazine reported last month that record sales are at a 28-year high, and climbing.

May 26, 2016

Do you long for the drone of the bagpipes on cool foggy mornings? Do you ever find pants too restrictive? Are plaid skirts more your thing? Can’t get enough haggis? Then you’re in luck, because the 14th annual Eugene Scottish Festival is this weekend. Join the tartan horde for traditional Celtic music and dancing, a dog parade, horse-drawn wagon rides, vendors, sheepdog trials and highland games, sword fights, an import shop and plenty of Scottish cuisine. There will be entertainment geared towards the kids also, including a bouncy house, face painting and more.

May 26, 2016

L.A.’s good-time indie-prog boy band Saint Motel is coming to town. Known for their bright, cinematic, retro ’70s music videos, Saint Motel got together almost 10 years ago, after pianist A.J. Jackson and guitarist Aaron Sharp met in film school. They added bassist Dak Lerdamornpong and drummer Greg Erwin and got to work producing some of the breeziest, most gleeful party songs you’re likely to hear anywhere. But their music is only a fraction of the Saint Motel appeal. The good-natured foursome rounds it all out with cheerful antics and merry theatricality.

May 26, 2016

When did we become afraid of science? In the face of waning science literacy and a growing anti-science movement Director John Schmor of the University Theatre pulled together a group of theatre and science majors to create Wonder If Wonder Why, an original play that examines scientific inquiry. The resulting production is a 90-minute science-art mash-up full of spectacle. The show presents a child-inspired investigation of the science involved in understanding light.

May 19, 2016

Music has the power to change lives for the better, says Holly Spencer, executive director of the Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras (ESYO). “When you go to a performance or even a class or rehearsal, that’s when you see what music is doing for these kids,” Spencer says. The music groups are gearing up for their spring concerts May 24-26. In a time when children in public school have fewer opportunities to participate in the arts, ESYO gives students a chance to engage musically.

May 19, 2016

Bright costumes, alter egos, larger-than-life personalities, mysterious origin stories, blood feuds, epic battles: the connection between comic books and hip hop is plain to see, but the relationship between the two counter cultures runs mad deep. To explore the sibling artforms’ tangled histories and cultural influences and impacts, the UO has organized a two-part program, titled Hip Hop and Comics: Cultures Combining, that brings together legendary visual artists, writers, rap stars and producers.

May 12, 2016

Fresh from their appearance at the Varsity Vocals International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella (ICCA) finals in New York City, Divisi, the UO’s premier women’s a cappella group, returns home with a performance this weekend, titled 15 Years of Divisi. “Being an ICCA finalist group is something that we have all dreamed of since we began preparing for this competition in August,” says Divisi’s Sam Westmoreland. Divisi co-founder Evynne Hollens adds: “The girls did not place [at ICCA], but certainly did us proud.