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November 23, 2016 04:03 PM

Janie Coverdell traveled from Eugene to Standing Rock in September to participate in the Sioux tribe's protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline. She recently returned to Cannon Ball, North Dakota, and is sending Eugene Weekly updates from the frontlines.

Coverdell, who is posting video on YouTube of events as Tlingit Girl, was present Nov. 20 when police began to shoot water at protesters in the below-freezing temperatures, as well as rubber bullets and tear gas. One protester, 21-year-old Sophia Wilansky, was severly injured and might lose her arm.

The Associated Press reports that Wilansky's father, Wayne Wilansky says his daughter was inured by the police: "There's multiple witnesses and my daughter, who was completely conscious, said they threw a grenade right at her."

Coverdell was in the thick of the Sunday night protests. She tells EW, "Unarmed women fell to their knees telling police they loved them and were praying for their generations, too. A police officer walked up and used high-pressure pepper spray right in their faces while their hands were in the air."

Coverdell says, "I followed police and called them out every time they approached peaceful protectors and as I drew attention to them for harming unarmed people the police would actually back off."

Coverdell says she was tear-gassed and sprayed with something else as well, adding that her stomach and throat are still not better. You can find her GoFundMe raising money for the trip to the protest here. She will continue to send updates.

Illustration by Trask Bedortha

November 18, 2016 03:38 PM

Welcome to my blog. I plan to use this space to share updates on recent columns, corrections, short topics and occasional news about what I am doing in my garden. 

This picture of Iris tenax appeared (in B/W) along with my column on drought-tolerant irises. In that article I listed a couple of sources for the iris species I discussed. Shortly after the column appeared in print, a friend told me about another source: Wild Ginger farm in Beavercreek, OR. 

This nursery lists many varieties of Pacific Coast hybrid iris and a few selections of Iris tenax (Oregon iris). They are open only by appointment. Call 503-632- 2338, or visit their website (wildgingerfarm.com) to view a plant list or make contact by email. By the way, the tiny white flowers around the iris in this picture are those of a native alumroot, Heuchera micrantha.

I got mine from Doak Creek Native Plant Nursery on Doak Creek Road, Eugene. I have found this coral bells relative to be very adaptable and easy to grow.

November 18, 2016 09:32 AM

In Moses(es) last night at White Bird Dance in Portland, Reggie Wilson/Fist and Heel Performance Group took the audience on a journey across time and space, exploring the intricacies and indelible spirit of culture and people, through movement and song.          

            “Why do we lead? How do we lead?” asked Wilson in the post-show talkback. “ And why do we follow?”

            I have to admit, weary from the post-election sobriety and facing an uncertain future, I was ready to live for the next four years in the lobby of PSU’s Lincoln Hall, as the cheerful dance audience assembled there represented the joyful diversity that I think the world should embrace.       

            I’ve followed reviews, and seen snippets of this work on video, but what a glorious opportunity to see it in real life. And timely.

            There was something prescient and cathartic in the telling, something crystal clear. Through his work, with a big heart, keen intelligence and pitch-perfect study, Wilson offers solace, sojourn, and a way forward:

            Exploring the African diaspora and the human global diaspora, Moses(es) interweaves popular religious iconography and storytelling, about Moses himself, with a bedrock narrative about the African American experience.

            The stage opens with the curtain pulled back, seeing the skeleton of the theater for what it is. Project into that rigging a timelessness, a place that isn’t presentational or artistic, but raw, and everywhere. The hollow scaffolds and dangling ropes, the bins and boxes: This could be a ship, a plantation, a city or a citadel.

            Crumpled Mylar tinsel is strewn about the stage in wild ellipses, and Wilson himself stuffs it into a big, red suitcase, as dancers move to their places.

            At one moment, dancers create a low level shape, nestled downstage, their heads facing the audience, they’re packed together in a crowded, comforting tangle that seems regimented and prescribed. My mind leaps to the etchings I’ve seen of the slave ships, with human beings commoditized for expedient shipping, like cargo.

            Later, dancers move with a hieroglyphic precision, delving into the shapes and stasis of stained glass, or reliefs. They seem like superheroes, bigger than life, projecting outwards an image of transparency and hope.

            Wilson transforms dishtowels – dishtowels – into a riveting depiction of slavery itself, repeating the patterns and rhythm of the folding, brushing, snapping of endless labor.

            A large cloth cracks like a whip.

            At another moment, the dancers move in downstage diagonals, creating a parted line for one dancer to leap through, briskly, in a moment of faith.

            In Wilson’s choreography, we see a tremendous development of language and reason, but there’s ease to the telling of this story, too. His facility draws on a deep methodology into modern dance, but his effervescent structure lends a tip of the hat to the postmodernists.

            One of the most stirring moments finds a reimagining of “Wading in the Water” – made famous by Alvin Ailey’s ‘Revelations’ – but within its slow, aching tempo, Wilson explores violence, and accountability.

            Wilson is never overt or ham-fisted. And his company, stellar performers all, bring a lush and exquisite range to the effort, compounding every alchemic reaction with their own humanity.

            The piece builds, warmly, with invitation to project into it our own thoughts and dreams.

            Wilson says he was inspired by mathematical fractals, “The way something looks at a small scale is the same as at the larger scale,” he says.

            It’s a perfect metaphor for the cutting up of culture, the scattering of home and peoples, all over the world.

            In the post-show conversation, Wilson takes us to a salient moment in the Moses myth:

            “Moses parted the seas, and his followers found themselves walking through the sand, with walls of water on either side.”  

            What must that have felt like?

            Maybe we’re all still finding out.   

November 17, 2016 12:08 PM

Press release is below.

City Council Renews Commitment to Safe, Inclusive Community

Council Resolution Opposes Acts of Hate, Intolerance and Encourages Reporting  

Council Resolution

Following one of the most divisive general elections in our country's recent history, with news reports of incidents of hate and bias occurring in other cities, Eugene officials have heard from members of vulnerable communities who are frightened and concerned for their safety.

To make clear its continuing commitment to a safe, welcoming community, at its meeting tonight the Eugene City Council unanimously approved a resolution stating, in part:

·       The City Council is committed to making Eugene a welcoming, inclusive, and safe community for everyone.

·       The City Council is committed to standing together with the people of Eugene in opposing hate and bias activities and acts of intolerance committed against our neighbors.  

·       The City Council is committed to report incidents of hate and bias and will build upon partnerships with community organizations to track and respond to these incidents.

The full resolution is attached and also copied below:  

Hate and Bias Incident Reporting and Response

The City of Eugene actively implements its Hate and Bias Response Plan, including responding to and tracking incidents, providing support to victims of incidents and producing an annual Hate and Bias report.

Although staff have seen no noticeable increase in recent days in reports directly to the City’s Human Rights and Neighborhood Involvement office or the Eugene Police Department, they have heard of local incidents from partner agencies.

The City of Eugene’s Office of Human Rights and Neighborhood Involvement (HRNI) encourages community members experiencing discrimination, hate or bias to report these incidents. According to the Department of Justice only 25-42% of all hate and bias crimes are reported.

To report such crimes or incidents, people may call either the Office of Human Rights and Neighborhood Involvement or the Eugene Police Department. HRNI provides community members an opportunity to report incidents and offers opportunities for support.

To file a report, community members may:

·       Stop by the HRNI office at 99 W. 10th Ave., Suite 116,

·       Call 541-682-5177, or

·       Online at http://www.eugene-or.gov/2476/Equity-and-Human-Rights-Contact-Form

If a person is experiencing immediate danger, they should call 911. People may also report incidents or crimes to the Police non-emergency line: 541-682-5111

 

 RESOLUTION NO. 5174

A RESOLUTION DECLARING THE CITY OF EUGENE’S COMMITMENT TO BEING A WELCOMING, INCLUSIVE, AND SAFE COMMUNITY FOR EVERYONE

        The City Council of the City of Eugene finds that:

A.      As the Mayor and City Council of the City of Eugene, we are united in our commitment to serve the people that we represent after the culmination of one of the most divisive general elections in our Country's history.

B.      In alignment with City Council’s goal of creating a safe and welcoming community, we are firm in our resolve to ensure that all people residing in, visiting and passing through the City of Eugene are safe.  We choose to be a leader in promoting human rights and social justice and equity, public safety and social well-being.

C.      The City of Eugene has a long standing history and commitment of supporting many communities who are experiencing hate, bias and discrimination and the City Council has adopted Ordinances and Resolutions that demonstrate this commitment, including:

1.      Human Rights Municipal Code provisions, EC 4.613 - 4.655 (adopted in 1971, with the most recent amendment adopted in 2014 which made it unlawful to discriminate based on gender (Ord. 20523))

2.      Resolution 5073 (adopted 2012) Support of a Statement of Principles for Immigrant Integration

3.      Resolution 5142 (adopted in 2015) A Resolution Declaring the Urgency of the Housing and Homelessness Crisis

4.      Resolution 5148 (adopted in 2016) A Resolution Declaring the Second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day

5.      Resolution 5150 (adopted in 2016) A Resolution Supporting the Oregon Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women

6.      Resolution 5154 (adopted in 2016) A Resolution Declaring the City of Eugene’s Commitment in Protecting Refugees

D.      We believe in and are committed to continue our work to build a community that is welcoming, inclusive, just and safe for everyone.

E.      We welcome all people and recognize the rights of individuals to live their lives with dignity, free of discrimination and targeting because of their age, faith, race, national origin, immigration status, gender identity, ability, ethnicity, housing status, sexual orientation, economic status or other social status.

F.      We are committed to treating all people fairly, and to fully embracing the unique contributions of all Eugene residents regardless of age, faith, race, national origin, immigration status, gender identity, ability, ethnicity, housing status, sexual orientation, economic status or other social status.

G.      We strongly condemn bias, intimidation, harassment and other acts that are based on age, faith, race, national origin, immigration status, gender identity, ability, ethnicity, housing status, sexual orientation, economic status or other social status.

H.      We are committed to ensuring that all members of our community are free from acts that are rooted in fear, ignorance, prejudice, and hate.

NOW, THEREFORE,

        BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF EUGENE, a Municipal Corporation of the State of Oregon, as follows:

 Section 1.  The City Council is committed to making Eugene a welcoming, inclusive, and safe community for everyone.

Section 2.  The City Council is committed to standing together with the people of Eugene in opposing hate and bias activities and acts of intolerance committed against our neighbors.  

Section 3.  The City Council is committed to its mechanisms the community can use to report incidents of hate and bias and will build upon partnerships with community organizations and local agencies to track and respond to these incidents in the City of Eugene's annual Hate and Bias report and at the direction of the City of Eugene's Hate and Bias Response Plan.

Section 4.  This Resolution is effective immediately upon its passage by the City Council. 

        The foregoing Resolution adopted the 14th day of November, 2016.

 

November 11, 2016 09:55 AM

Following the Nov. 8 election of Donald Trump to the U.S. presidency, universities, schools and other institutions are responding to the fears of hate and bigotry. Today, Oregon State University President Ed Ray sent out this missive:

Faculty, staff and students,

Many members of our university community are experiencing a range of significant, heartfelt emotions following Tuesday’s election.

Several faculty, staff and students have shared with me that they fear for their future and the futures of family members and friends, especially people from diverse backgrounds and identities. Other members of our community are expressing joy about political change. Each of these emotions is personal and powerful.

As members of our university community, we must care for each other and support one another despite the turmoil of the moment. If you are in need of assistance or would like to talk to someone about what you are experiencing, and are a Corvallis student, please visit the Student Affairs Student Resources website at http://experience.oregonstate.edu/resources. OSU-Cascades students should visit http://osucascades.edu/student-wellness. Employees needing assistance may utilize the OSU Employee Assistance Program by confidentially calling 1-800-433-2320 at any time or by calling the Human Resources Department at 541-737-3103.

I ask you to join me in looking ahead.

At this moment of national transition, we reaffirm that Oregon State’s mission of inclusive excellence in teaching, research, and outreach and engagement has not changed. OSU’s mission to promote economic, social, cultural and environmental progress for the people of Oregon, the nation and the world remains essential, and we will not realize our vision for the future unless we find common ground with those around us and unless we persist in this effort.

Since its founding, this country has overcome division and uncertainty by people coming together to address challenges, by respecting differences, and by demonstrating compassion and leadership.

This is the 56th presidential election in our nation’s history and every transition of leadership has occurred peacefully. The need for us to support each other, celebrate our diversity and promote the success of every member of our community and America remains unaltered. This is at the core of who we are and how we need to go forward.

On Wednesday, I saw impressive, moving and peaceful evidence of this America among us as dozens upon dozens of OSU students gathered in the Memorial Union quad throughout the day, and where approximately 400 students and community members marched through the evening on campus to call for an end to hate and to focus on our common humanity.

Let each of us help and serve one another. Let each of us help bring America together, while we count on and challenge all of our country’s leaders to do the same.

Going forward, I encourage you to stay engaged in our nation’s political process and lead your own lives in ways that reflect our common values as a community.

I am here to help, care and, with you, lead forward.

Edward J. Ray

November 10, 2016 12:03 AM

Zoie Gilpin was just leaving a meeting of the Black Student Union Nov. 9 on the University of Oregon campus when she came across three people painting themselves in blackface.

She says, "One person laughed and directed a comment at me saying, 'Sorry that my friends are racist,' followed by more laughing. I said, 'Do you think this is funny?'"

Gilpin who The Oregonian says is biracial tells EW that he replied, "Yes, I do [think it's funny]. I don't actually think that my friends are racist; we are doing this for fun." And she says he continued to laugh about it, so she began to record the video that she subsequently posted on Twitter and was shared by Malia Thomas in a public Facebook post. 

Gilpin says, "I'm infuriated. We were just discussing how we need to stick together as a black community" at the BSU meeting and "as soon as I leave, I run into this situation."

She adds, " It's not fair that we as a minority have to face this or any discrimination at all, let alone multiple times in a row. Blackface is just a thing now? And that's okay?"

She says the incident has been reportd to the campus police.

Update:

Below is the statement from the UO on the incident.

Dear Campus Community,
 
The University of Oregon has been made aware of an incident involving young people wearing blackface on campus this evening. The use of blackface is patently offensive and reinforces historically racist stereotypes. While there is no evidence that the individuals who wore blackface are part of the UO community, it has no place in our society or at the UO. 
 
We commend the members of the UO community who have expressed themselves through a series of peaceful demonstrations today that were respectful of other members of our community. In addition, the students who witnessed this incident, showed great maturity and judgment in their reaction to it.
 
The incident has been reported to Student Life and the UOPD, which has doubled their patrols on campus this evening. The UO is committed to fostering a campus culture that values diversity, equity, and inclusion. We continue to be focused on supporting our students and providing a welcoming, safe, and respectful environment.
 
Sincerely,
 
Dr. R. Kevin Marbury
Interim Vice President for Student Life
 

 

 
November 10, 2016 04:26 PM

What gives us hope and how do we resist the results we fear from a Trump presidency?

Send us your events, your ideas your activism. Resistance is not futile. As we wrote in slant this week:

We are in shock at the dawning of a Trump presidency and all that we stand to lose: Roe v. Wade, civil rights, immigration reform, media freedom, minority representation, climate change, the list goes on. The path to resistance becomes clear. Don’t circle the wagons; don’t snipe at the Bernie voters. It’s time to listen to the anger of those who elected Trump as well as to the thoughts and fears of those who are most hurt by the policies Trump has said he will put into place. We won’t give in to hate and despair. We will reassess and move forward to create the nation we want to be.

Jezebel has been compiling  "A List of Pro-Women, Pro-Immigrant, Pro-Earth, Anti-Bigotry Organizations That Need Your Support." And we'd love to hear from you of organizations locally who are in that fight.

Locally, here are some ideas for hope and activism.

Hope

• South Eugene High School students marching Nov. 9 to say hate and fear do not represent them. 

Youth activists winning in the battle to stop climate change Nov. 10.

Activism

• Protest Trump in Eugene! 5 pm Nov. 10, starts at Erb Memorial Union on the University of Oregon campus and goes to Kesey Square (aka Broadway Plaza, 10 E. Broadway) downtown. 

• Vigil for Hope and Respect starts at 5 pm Nov. 10 at Kesey Square 

• Protest Trump March Monday, Nov. 14, 5 pm, Island Park in Springfield. 

Do you have ideas? Events? Hope? Activism? Send them to editor@eugeneweekly.com. Or write a letter and send to letters@eugeneweekly.com.

November 10, 2016 04:40 PM

Our Children's Trust gives us a ray of hope after Donald Trump won the presidential election — and promptly appointed a climate denier to his Environmental Protection Agency transition team.

The federal government and fossil industry argued that the lawsuit put forth by 21 youth plaintiffs shouldn't go forward. But the youth won in court and the case will go forward.

The full press release is below.

Victory for America’s Youth – Constitutional Climate Lawsuit against U.S. to Proceed

Federal Judge Ann Aiken rejects U.S. government and fossil fuel industries motions to dismiss

Eugene, OR – Today, the federal court in Eugene, Oregon decided in favor of 21 youth plaintiffs in their “groundbreaking” constitutional climate lawsuit against President Obama, numerous federal agencies, and the fossil fuel industry. U.S. District Court Judge Ann Aiken completely rejected all arguments to dismiss raised by the federal government and fossil fuel industry, determining that the young plaintiffs’ constitutional and public trust claims could proceed. Now, the 21 plaintiffs, who range in age from 9-20, are preparing for trial in what is believed to be a turning point in United States constitutional history.

In determining the complaint to be valid, Judge Aiken’s ruling contained these passages:

“Federal courts too often have been cautious and overly deferential in the arena of environmental law, and the world has suffered for it.”

...

“Although the United States has made international commitments regarding climate change, granting the relief requested here would be fully consistent with those commitments. There is no contradiction between promising other nations the United States will reduce C02 emissions and a judicial order directing the United States to go beyond its international commitments to more aggressively reduce C02 emissions.”

...

“[The defendants and intervenors] are correct that plaintiffs likely could not obtain the relief they seek through citizen suits brought under the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, or other environmental laws. But that argument misses the point. This action is of a different order than the typical environmental case. It alleges that defendants’ actions and inactions - whether or not they violate any specific statutory duty - have so profoundly damaged our home planet that they threaten plaintiffs’ fundamental constitutional rights to life and liberty.”

“My generation is rewriting history,” said Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, a 16-year-old plaintiff and youth director of Earth Guardians. “We’re doing what so many people told us we were incapable of doing: holding our leaders accountable for their disastrous and dangerous actions. I and my co-plaintiffs are demanding justice for our generation and justice for all future generations. This is going to be the trial of our lifetimes.”

“This decision is one of the most significant in our Nation’s history,” said Julia Olson, counsel for the plaintiffs and executive director of Our Children’s Trust. “This court just gave the youth of this country the critical opportunity to protect their futures. In what will be the trial of the millennium, these young plaintiffs will prove that their federal government, in cooperation with the fossil fuel industry, has knowingly put them in grave danger, trading their futures for present convenience and gross profits for a few.”

“It’s clear Judge Aiken gets what’s at stake for us,” said 17-year-old plaintiff Victoria Barrett, from White Plains, New York. “Our planet and our generation don’t have time to waste. If we continue on our current path, my school in Manhattan will be underwater in 50 years. We are moving to trial and I’m looking forward to having the world see the incredible power my generation holds. We are going to put our nation on a science-based path toward climate stabilization.”

“Based on our Constitution, Judge Aiken correctly determined we have properly claimed the federal defendants are responsible for harm caused by climate change and these young plaintiffs may challenge the government’s wholly inadequate climate change policies in court,” said Plaintiffs’ co-lead counsel Philip Gregory, with Cotchett, Pitre, & McCarthy, LLP of Burlingame, CA. 

“This is a critical step toward solution of the climate problem, and none to soon as climate change is accelerating,” said Dr. James Hansen, guardian in the case for all future generations, and world-renowned climate scientist. “Now we must ask the Court to require the government to reduce fossil fuel emissions at a rate consistent with the science.”

The young plaintiffs sued the federal government for violating their constitutional rights to life, liberty, and property, and their rights to vital public trust resources, by locking in a fossil-fuel based national energy system for more than five decades with full knowledge of the extreme dangers it posed.

This federal case is one of many related legal actions brought by youth in several states and countries, all supported by Our Children’s Trust, seeking science-based action by governments to stabilize the climate system.

Our Children's Trust is a nonprofit organization, elevating the voice of youth, those with most to lose, to secure the legal right to a healthy atmosphere and stable climate on behalf of present and future generations. We lead a coordinated global human rights and environmental justice campaign to implement enforceable science-based Climate Recovery Plans that will return atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration to below 350 ppm by the year 2100. www.ourchildrenstrust.org/

Earth Guardians is a Colorado-based nonprofit organization with youth chapters on five continents, and multiple groups in the United States with thousands of members working together to protect the Earth, the water, the air, and the atmosphere, creating healthy sustainable communities globally. We inspire and empower young leaders, families, schools, organizations, cities, and government officials to make positive change locally, nationally, and globally to address the critical state of the Earth. www.earthguardians.org

Counsel for Plaintiffs include Philip L. Gregory, Esq. of Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy of Burlingame, CA, Daniel M. Galpern, Esq. of Eugene, OR, and Julia Olson, Esq., also of Eugene, OR.

 

 

November 9, 2016 02:57 PM

After an earthshaking election night, students at South Eugene High School wanted to send a message that hate and fear does not represent them. Hundreds of students gathered in front of their high school Wednesday at noon, carrying signs. They buzzed with energy, frustration and hope.

High school student Maia Barnebey says students decided to march because they weren't happy with the results of the election. "We didn't get a say in this," Barnebey explained. As a member of the LGBTQ community, she worries a Trump administration will take away her right to marry. She said she also fears for women's rights and her ability to make decisions about her own body.

"I just wanna live my life," she pointed out.

"And I just wanna live," said Angel McNabb-Lyons, who came to the rally to express her dissastisfaction with the uptick in hate crimes and racial slurs, which she and her friends have personally been victimized by.

"I was shocked," she said of the outcome of the election.

Students emphasized that the rally was not an anti-Trump rally (although several students carried "Fuck Trump" signs), but rather, a gathering in support of love, peace and acceptance.

As students marched down 18th Avenue towards the University of Oregon campus, they carried signs and cheered as cars drove by and honked in support. People lined the streets, filming the rally and calling out their approval. 

Students chanted for the environment, for reproductive rights, for LGBTQ rights, for women's rights, for racial equality. They shouted for peace and love, calling to "build bridges, not walls."

The procession made its way down 13th Avenue through the UO campus; faculty members and students emerged from buildings to watch the march, some with tears in their eyes. The large group convened on the Erb Memorial Union plaza, where hundreds crowded the pavilion to hold their signs and chant.

"As youth, we bear the biggest brunt of the consequences of this election," SEHS graduate Kelsey Juliana said into a megaphone, addressing the crowd. "We have to organize and come together and recognize that the youth are damn loud!"

Miles Pendleton, the president of the Eugene-Springfield NAACP's Youth Council, took the megaphone and spoke of his father who lived in the South in the 1950s and wasn't allowed to walk through the front doors of restaurants. He said his father was greatly discouraged by the outcome of the election. "We need to stand together right now to make this country the place we want it to be," he said.

As high school students continued their march down 13th, college students joined in the procession. 

"These are high school students doing this," one college student remarked. "How cool is that?"

November 8, 2016 03:08 PM

At about 1:30 pm this afternoon, a Eugene Weekly staffer spotted this pro-Trump truck across the street from the Lane County Elections office at 10th and Lincoln downtown.

The sheriff on duty at the office tells EW that the owner of the truck was there for about 10 minutes and was voting inside the election office. The sheriff told EW that the owner of the truck was told he had to move his vehicle and was warned not to do it again.

This seem pretty close to electioneering, which is illegal, according to Oregon law ORS 260.695(2);Restrictions on Electioneering at State or Local Government Buildings Designated for Ballot Deposit.

The law states that:

 “Electioneering” includes the display, distribution or circulation of any political material or verbal statements supporting or opposing a candidate or ballot measure on any election, even an election other than the one being conducted. It also includes exit polling and the gathering of signatures on any election-related petition.

The electioneering ban does not apply to the wearing of political buttons or other insignia (t-shirts, caps, etc.), which relate to the election in a polling place in a county clerk’s office, as a means of personal expression. Electioneering actions beyond this are not allowed.

So, electioneering is not allowed within “100 feet measured radially from any entrance to the building, during any time that the elections building is open to the public.”

But what about cars with political bumper stickers parked within that 100-foot radius? Oregon law only goes as far as to say it’s OK for county election employees and officials:

“In most cases, employees who work in a building that is periodically issuing ballots for an election (which can happen often for extended periods of time up to four times a year) should be able to continue to park their vehicle in their assigned spots even though they are located within 100 feet of the building and even though the vehicle has some political campaign bumper stickers affixed.”

The law does not provide that same exemption for the public. Even so, you could say that there’s quite the chasm between a bumper sticker and a huge sign for Trump-Pence.

Read more about Oregon election law here.

November 8, 2016 01:35 PM

In which the Germans remind us of our "greatness."

Lyrics are below the Horror Clown.

Lyrics by NEO MAGAZIN ROYALE mit Jan Böhmermann.

 I was born in post-Nazi Germany.
In 1981.
Ronald Reagan just got into office, man, there’s been a cold war going on.

Deutschland, my homeland, so divided! 
But you tore down wall and helped us reunite it, America, America!

You taught us democracy, freedom of speech, equality and liberty.
You gave us David Hasselhoff, one of the greatest actors and singers there’ll ever be.
You brought us the McRib, Windows ME, Type II-Diabetes and the great Bill Cosby, 
America, so inspiring, 
your soon-to-be foresightful foreign policy!

America, God shed His grace on thee.
And thy new triumphant maxim so full of modesty.

Chorus
Grab ‘em by the pussy!
You can do anything!
You are a star, go on and do it! 
Move on ‘em like a bitch!

Grab the whole world by the pussy! 
You can do anything!
Don’t even ask, go on and do it!
You don’t need to use some Tic Tacs!

Some many great American idols,
Dennis Rodman, Rudy Giuliani, and the great actor from Happy Days.
Almost as awesome as Fonzy.
America, we thank you for your recent contributions to political culture.
You definitely killed it bigly this time.
And that means something coming from a German!

Thank you for lowering the bar.
You taught us lately, everyone can make it, if one is just great enough – and a TV-Star.

Chorus
Grab ‘em by the pussy!
You can do anything!
You are a star, go on and do it! 
Move on ‘em like a bitch!

Grab the whole world by the pussy! 
You can do anything!
Don’t even ask, go on and do it!
You don’t need to use some Tic Tacs!

We love the new spirit of your nation! Let’s hand in hand walk into isolation!

Chorus
Grab ‘em by the pussy!
You can do anything!
You are a star, go on and do it! 
Move on ‘em like a bitch!

Grab the whole world by the pussy! 
You can do anything!
Don’t even ask, go on and do it!
You don’t need to use some Tic Tacs!

November 8, 2016 12:23 PM

As news of another young woman killed in an alleged domestic violence incident hits the R-G, and in the wake of settling its stalking lawsuit, LCC is offering a sexual assault, dating and self defense series. See the press release below.

LCC Public Safety offers assault prevention training, Nov. 16

Eugene, Ore.—Lane Community College Public Safety is offering another Sexual Assault/Dating & Domestic Violence Awareness/Self-Defense training series.

• Sexual Assault Awareness Training, Wednesday, November 16, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. in Building 4, Room 105. This class is open to the entire college community as well as the general public. During this one-hour class, attendees will be given instruction on how to prevent sexual assaults and harassment; what to do and not do if you are sexually assaulted; and how and where to report incidents.

• Dating and Domestic Violence Awareness, November 16, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in Building 4, Room 105. The Dating and Domestic Violence Awareness presentation was put together with the goal of helping people out of abusive relationships, recognizing abusive relationships (whether its their own relationship or a friends/family). Instructors will provide information on warning signs of abuse, what abuse is, making a plan to get away safely, resources around the college and the community (both emergency and legal). There will also be information about restraining orders and stalking orders, and handouts on resources and safety planning.

• Basic Self-Defense Training, November 16, 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Building 4, Room 105. This class is open to the entire college community as well as the general public. During the four-hour class, which will be taught by Corporal Ryan Sager, Rape Aggression Defense instructor, attendees will be led through a series of warm up exercises to help loosen up and prevent injury. Participants will be instructed on proper methods to perform a variety of strikes and escape techniques. Be sure to wear loose fitting clothing. Participants will be monitored as they practice their new skills on strike bags and assistants.

In addition to hands-on exercises, participants will learn about personal safety in parking lots, including situational awareness, walking confidently and with head held high, and having keys in hand, ready to open a car door or be used to protect oneself.

November 8, 2016 05:00 PM

As we anxiously watch election results come in (current go-tos are The New York Times and 538) what happens if no candidate were to get "a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed” per the 12th Amendment to the Constitution?

According to the Congressional Research Service, "With a total of 538 electors representing the 50 states and the District of Columbia, 270 electoral votes is the 'magic number,' the arithmetic majority necessary to win the presidency."

On Nov. 3, the CRS published "Contingent Election of the President and Vice President by Congress: Perspectives and Contemporary Analysis" by Thomas H. Neale, specialist in American National Government.

Neale writes that if no candidate won a majority of electoral votes:

The 12 th Amendment also provides that the House of Representatives would elect the President, and the Senate would elect the Vice President, in a procedure known as “contingent election.” Contingent election has been implemented twice in the nation’s history under the 12th Amendment: first, to elect the President in 1825, and second, the Vice President in 1837.

In a contingent election, the House would choose among the three candidates who received the most electoral votes. Each state, regardless of population, casts a single vote for President in a contingent election. Representatives of states with two or more Representatives would therefore need to conduct an internal poll within their state delegation to decide which candidate would receive the state’s single vote. A majority of state votes, 26 or more, is required to elect, and the House must vote “immediately” and “by ballot.” Additional precedents exist from 1825, but they would not be binding on the House in a contemporary election. In a contingent election, the Senate elects the Vice President, choosing one of the two candidates who received the most electoral votes. Each Senator casts a single vote, and the votes of a majority of the whole Senate, 51 or more, are necessary to elect. The District of Columbia, which is not a state, would not participate in a contingent election, despite the fact that it casts three electoral votes. 

Read the whole report here.