Back Beat

Chromeo
Chromeo

Purveyors of dark folk, O’Death, were shacking up in Brooklyn and playing frenetic Americana stomp before either made hipsters drool. You may know them from their ethereal 2011 hit “Bugs,” but now you’ll remember them for the band’s haunting and beautiful fourth album, Out of Hands We Go, released in early October. “We wanted to explore a grittier sound but continue on this path of doing melodic music,” lead singer and guitarist Greg Jamie tells EW. “Pretty much every album has been us trying to step outside of ourselves and work in a different way. It’s my favorite album.” Jamie notes that, after 10 years as band, the live show is a must-see. “We’re like one limb,” he says. “We’re more locked in than we’ve ever been.” Catch O’Death with Stone Jack Jones and Coyote Friday Oct. 24 at Sam Bond’s.

 

Eugene is on the map for a lot of reasons: Ken Kesey, environmental activism, football. And as of last year, Eugene placed third worldwide with 213 zombie-clad dancers for Thrill the World, an event “attempting to break the world record for the largest simultaneous dance to Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller.’” The Eugene chapter is vying for first again 1:30 to 3:30 pm Saturday, Oct. 25, at Washington-Jefferson Park’s basketball court when an expected 200 to 250 dancers (who have been practicing for two months) will perform.

 

Local hip-hop artist Garin Reese hosts a CD-release party for his new album Free to Fall 9 pm Saturday, Oct. 25, at The Granary Pizza Co. with Sammy Warm Hands, Ogar Burl, Lisa Vasquez, Rituals and DJ Cable.

 

France gave us Daft Punk and French Canada gives us Chromeo, another intoxicatingly fun electronic duo out of Montreal with a penchant for funk or, as they’ve described themselves, “the only successful Arab/Jewish partnership since the dawn of human culture.” David Macklovitch and Patrick Gemayel of Chromeo hit the McDonald stage 8 pm Wednesday, Oct. 29. It will be a guaranteed dance party with hits like “Jealous (I Ain’t With It)” and “Come Alive” off the 2014 album White Women. “You know, cute retail hipster girl, fun music,” as Macklovitch told Rolling Stone.