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Movies

June 15, 2017 12:00 AM

Too much has already been said about It Comes at Night, a completely insidious and utterly unsettling new horror film that continues to worm its way under my skin, days after viewing it.

Too much has already been said about It Comes at Night, a completely insidious and utterly unsettling new horror film that continues to worm its way under my skin, days after viewing it.

So, instead of talking about It Comes at Night, and thereby disarming its power to shock and disturb you, I’d like to speak for a moment about horror films in general, and what they tell us about ourselves.

June 8, 2017 12:00 AM

Why do superheroes do what they do? It’s a question often answered with a glib oversimplification: It’s the right thing. When you’ve developed a super-suit to save your own ass, it’s the proper thing to use it to stop bad guys. Whether a freak accident gifts you with super-speed, or a spider bites you — same deal. 

Why do superheroes do what they do? It’s a question often answered with a glib oversimplification: It’s the right thing. When you’ve developed a super-suit to save your own ass, it’s the proper thing to use it to stop bad guys. Whether a freak accident gifts you with super-speed, or a spider bites you — same deal. 

June 1, 2017 12:00 AM

Alongside baseball, the sport of boxing has provided a seemingly inexhaustible supply of stories for movies to tell. Brutal, lonely and intimately attuned to the American experience of aggressive individualism, boxing exposes the loutish violence that is the secret endgame of all conflict. It just reverses the order.

Alongside baseball, the sport of boxing has provided a seemingly inexhaustible supply of stories for movies to tell. Brutal, lonely and intimately attuned to the American experience of aggressive individualism, boxing exposes the loutish violence that is the secret endgame of all conflict. It just reverses the order.

May 25, 2017 12:00 AM

Ponderous, pornographic and unforgivably dull, Alien: Covenant proves once and for all that Ridley Scott is the single biggest hack in contemporary Hollywood — a director of such ignominious bad faith that, faced with the morally bankrupt option of playing pimp or whore to his own reputation, he simply chooses both.

Ponderous, pornographic and unforgivably dull, Alien: Covenant proves once and for all that Ridley Scott is the single biggest hack in contemporary Hollywood — a director of such ignominious bad faith that, faced with the morally bankrupt option of playing pimp or whore to his own reputation, he simply chooses both.

May 18, 2017 12:00 AM

Whether aging is kind to an actor seems to be largely a matter of choice, and by extension, integrity. Often, great actors getting on in years seem to opt for a kind of working retirement, leaning back like a senescent actor emeritus on the coattails of previous grand achievements.

Whether aging is kind to an actor seems to be largely a matter of choice, and by extension, integrity. Often, great actors getting on in years seem to opt for a kind of working retirement, leaning back like a senescent actor emeritus on the coattails of previous grand achievements.

Robert De Niro comes to mind, a once-stunning actor who appears, bafflingly, to content himself now with reprising his early genius to the point of caricature and low comedy.

May 11, 2017 12:00 AM

Director Lone Scherfig’s new movie, Their Finest, made me giddy. Walking out of the Bijou, full of fellow feeling, I impulsively chatted up the older couple on the sidewalk in front of me. “They just don’t make movies like that anymore,” I said at one point. The woman turned to me with a smile. “I know,” she said. “But they just did.”

Some movies make me talk, others shut me up good. After watching Lars von Trier’s Melancholia, for example, I couldn’t talk for two hours. Total silence. Couldn’t find a word.

On the other hand, director Lone Scherfig’s new movie, Their Finest, made me giddy. Walking out of the Bijou, full of fellow feeling, I impulsively chatted up the older couple on the sidewalk in front of me. “They just don’t make movies like that anymore,” I said at one point. The woman turned to me with a smile. “I know,” she said. “But they just did.”

May 4, 2017 12:00 AM

Within the first few minutes of The Circle, a tiresome cinematic exercise in false dichotomies, Mae (Emma Watson) tells a friend that she’ll send him a text. If you think back very carefully, you may remember a time before text was a verb, but that time is not now, let alone the super-networked near-future of The Circle.

Within the first few minutes of The Circle, a tiresome cinematic exercise in false dichotomies, Mae (Emma Watson) tells a friend that she’ll send him a text. If you think back very carefully, you may remember a time before text was a verb, but that time is not now, let alone the super-networked near-future of The Circle.

April 27, 2017 12:00 AM

A carousing alcoholic with a tendency toward blackout, Gloria (the excellent Anne Hathaway) saunters home at sunrise one morning to find that her boyfriend, Tim (Dan Stevens), has packed her bags. Game over: It’s time for this girl — and her lies, lame excuses and generally bad behavior — to go. Goodbye New York, farewell failed writing career and hello Midwest hometown, where Gloria, tail between her legs, shacks up in a vacant rental owned by her conspicuously absent parents.

A carousing alcoholic with a tendency toward blackout, Gloria (the excellent Anne Hathaway) saunters home at sunrise one morning to find that her boyfriend, Tim (Dan Stevens), has packed her bags. Game over: It’s time for this girl — and her lies, lame excuses and generally bad behavior — to go. Goodbye New York, farewell failed writing career and hello Midwest hometown, where Gloria, tail between her legs, shacks up in a vacant rental owned by her conspicuously absent parents.

April 20, 2017 12:00 AM

There are several spoilable things in The Fate of the Furious, and most of them have to do with family — “family” being the eight-film series’ touchstone, its go-to word when Vin Diesel needs to intone something meaningfully.

There are several spoilable things in The Fate of the Furious, and most of them have to do with family — “family” being the eight-film series’ touchstone, its go-to word when Vin Diesel needs to intone something meaningfully.

But it is no spoiler to tell you that Diesel’s Dom Toretto wins the first race he’s in, because Dom always wins, eventually. He may barely scrape by, or fling himself into something ass-first, or piece together an absurd plan with the help of his family, but he’ll get there.

April 13, 2017 12:00 AM

Danny Boyle’s Trainspotting, released in 1996, felt instantly mythic. A grubby, inspired adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s novel that stars a vibrant, nearly vibrating Ewan McGregor, the film felt new and breathless and terrifying, a movie about fuckup junkies that didn’t shy away from euphoric highs or moments of extreme bleakness.

Danny Boyle’s Trainspotting, released in 1996, felt instantly mythic. A grubby, inspired adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s novel that stars a vibrant, nearly vibrating Ewan McGregor, the film felt new and breathless and terrifying, a movie about fuckup junkies that didn’t shy away from euphoric highs or moments of extreme bleakness.

April 6, 2017 12:00 AM

The premise is just so damn tasty: A teenaged vegan, Justine (Garance Marillier), enters the veterinary school where her sister, Alexia (Ella Rumpf), is already an upperclassman. The college, a stark, bizarre combination of penitentiary and permanent rave, sports a series of strange hazing rituals, including newbies like Justine getting doused with blood, Carrie style, and being forced to choke down uncooked rabbit kidneys like communion wafers.

The premise is just so damn tasty: A teenaged vegan, Justine (Garance Marillier), enters the veterinary school where her sister, Alexia (Ella Rumpf), is already an upperclassman. The college, a stark, bizarre combination of penitentiary and permanent rave, sports a series of strange hazing rituals, including newbies like Justine getting doused with blood, Carrie style, and being forced to choke down uncooked rabbit kidneys like communion wafers.

March 30, 2017 12:00 AM

I live with two cats, and I haven’t looked at either of them in quite the same way since seeing Kedi, a lovely new documentary about the entrenched population of street cats roaming the ancient city of Istanbul.

I live with two cats, and I haven’t looked at either of them in quite the same way since seeing Kedi, a lovely new documentary about the entrenched population of street cats roaming the ancient city of Istanbul.

March 23, 2017 12:00 AM

There shouldn’t be anything more enjoyable than watching David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike making their way through a biopic deftly directed by Amma Asante (Belle). Oyelowo has played compelling leaders before, with his should-have-been-Oscar-nominated performance as Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma; Pike’s last role was an unexpected breakout, after a decade of work, as the scheming Amy Dunne in Gone Girl.

There shouldn’t be anything more enjoyable than watching David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike making their way through a biopic deftly directed by Amma Asante (Belle). Oyelowo has played compelling leaders before, with his should-have-been-Oscar-nominated performance as Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma; Pike’s last role was an unexpected breakout, after a decade of work, as the scheming Amy Dunne in Gone Girl.

March 16, 2017 12:00 AM

I am so utterly sick to death of human beings and their selfish, greedy, murderous ways that — when the latest incarnation of everyone’s favorite big ape finally shows up in Kong: Skull Island, swatting Vietnam-era whirlybirds out of the sky and otherwise tearing the invading army to shreds — I was rooting tooth-and-nail for Kong to finish the job and put a merciful stop to the next 90 minutes of misanthropic torment.

I am so utterly sick to death of human beings and their selfish, greedy, murderous ways that — when the latest incarnation of everyone’s favorite big ape finally shows up in Kong: Skull Island, swatting Vietnam-era whirlybirds out of the sky and otherwise tearing the invading army to shreds — I was rooting tooth-and-nail for Kong to finish the job and put a merciful stop to the next 90 minutes of misanthropic torment.

March 9, 2017 12:00 AM

If you’ve seen either of the previous Wolverine movies, you may harbor some entirely understandable skepticism about why the grumpy mutant needs a third solo outing. 2009’s X-Men Origins: Wolverine is mostly infamous for being the movie that sewed Deadpool’s mouth shut. 2013’s The Wolverine was better, but still a far cry from great. 

If you’ve seen either of the previous Wolverine movies, you may harbor some entirely understandable skepticism about why the grumpy mutant needs a third solo outing. 2009’s X-Men Origins: Wolverine is mostly infamous for being the movie that sewed Deadpool’s mouth shut. 2013’s The Wolverine was better, but still a far cry from great. 

March 9, 2017 12:00 AM

As is now somewhat of a tradition, this year’s annual HUMP! homemade porn festival — conceived and carried out by “Seattle’s only newspaper” The Stranger — descends on our fair city this weekend.

Full disclosure: I’ve never been. Up until this screener, I’d never seen what this festival had to offer and, admittedly, I had my own preconceived notions. 

As is now somewhat of a tradition, this year’s annual HUMP! homemade porn festival — conceived and carried out by “Seattle’s only newspaper” The Stranger — descends on our fair city this weekend.

Full disclosure: I’ve never been. Up until this screener, I’d never seen what this festival had to offer and, admittedly, I had my own preconceived notions. 

March 1, 2017 12:00 AM

Get Out’s opening scene appears, at first, disconnected from the main story — a moment that simply sets the stage. As a young black man lost on suburban streets jokes on his phone, a car pulls up alongside him. Just that is already creepy; it should remind you of countless images of horror — from the movies, and from real life.

How this scene connects to the rest of writer-director Jordan Peele’s debut feature film isn’t immediately clear, but the tone is deftly, elegantly set: What looks like a cozy quiet neighborhood to a white person looks like something else entirely if you’re black.

Get Out’s opening scene appears, at first, disconnected from the main story — a moment that simply sets the stage. As a young black man lost on suburban streets jokes on his phone, a car pulls up alongside him. Just that is already creepy; it should remind you of countless images of horror — from the movies, and from real life.

February 23, 2017 12:00 AM

James Baldwin is one of my all-time heroes. His writing, not to mention the mere fact of his life and times, inspires in me a devastating sense of humility, a leveling of intellectual pride that I always experience when confronted by a solitary artist speaking truth at every cost to himself.

Nothing I write could add to or elaborate or enhance Baldwin’s work in the least. He’s that good. Awe is my only response to the furious, righteous brilliance of his words and vision.

James Baldwin is one of my all-time heroes. His writing, not to mention the mere fact of his life and times, inspires in me a devastating sense of humility, a leveling of intellectual pride that I always experience when confronted by a solitary artist speaking truth at every cost to himself.

Nothing I write could add to or elaborate or enhance Baldwin’s work in the least. He’s that good. Awe is my only response to the furious, righteous brilliance of his words and vision.

February 16, 2017 12:00 AM

The great Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky invented the modern suspense thriller with Crime and Punishment, the story of a poor college student who murders his landlady with an ax and is hounded throughout the rest of the book by his conscience and a dogged detective who baits him mercilessly until he confesses.

The great Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky invented the modern suspense thriller with Crime and Punishment, the story of a poor college student who murders his landlady with an ax and is hounded throughout the rest of the book by his conscience and a dogged detective who baits him mercilessly until he confesses.

February 9, 2017 12:00 AM

Things to Come is an odd title (translated from the French L’avenir). Is it a threat or a promise? It’s a little of both, and all happening to Nathalie (Isabelle Huppert).

Things to Come is an odd title (translated from the French L’avenir). Is it a threat or a promise? It’s a little of both, and all happening to Nathalie (Isabelle Huppert).

January 19, 2017 12:00 AM

Oddly enough, it was a misguided defense of Elle that made me come around — to some degree — to Paul Verhoeven’s latest Rorschach test of a film. A tireless provocateur, Verhoeven (Starship Troopers, Showgirls) can also be tiresome, and Elle is a bit of both sides.

Oddly enough, it was a misguided defense of Elle that made me come around — to some degree — to Paul Verhoeven’s latest Rorschach test of a film. A tireless provocateur, Verhoeven (Starship Troopers, Showgirls) can also be tiresome, and Elle is a bit of both sides.

January 12, 2017 12:00 AM

The assassination of President John F. Kennedy in a Dallas motorcade on Nov. 22, 1963 was a national tragedy, but it was also a nightmare, and one from which we’ve never recovered. The parameters of tragedy are timeless and defined, but a nightmare is a different beast altogether: disorienting, chaotic, darkly impressionistic and symbolic of reality in a way that is ominous, apocalyptic and forever ill at ease.

The assassination of President John F. Kennedy in a Dallas motorcade on Nov. 22, 1963 was a national tragedy, but it was also a nightmare, and one from which we’ve never recovered. The parameters of tragedy are timeless and defined, but a nightmare is a different beast altogether: disorienting, chaotic, darkly impressionistic and symbolic of reality in a way that is ominous, apocalyptic and forever ill at ease.

January 5, 2017 12:00 AM

Despite opening to a fairly lukewarm reception in 1943, Casablanca has become one of the most beloved, if not the most beloved, Hollywood films of all time. The film struck an unexpected chord in audiences, and it continues to do so, offering a bittersweet vision of love that is almost cosmic in its implications — a vision in which romantic possibilities remain only possibilities, and soul mates don’t always mate. This is less tragic than resigned.

Despite opening to a fairly lukewarm reception in 1943, Casablanca has become one of the most beloved, if not the most beloved, Hollywood films of all time. The film struck an unexpected chord in audiences, and it continues to do so, offering a bittersweet vision of love that is almost cosmic in its implications — a vision in which romantic possibilities remain only possibilities, and soul mates don’t always mate. This is less tragic than resigned.

Life is sad, Casablanca tells us, but it’s not the end of the world.

December 29, 2016 12:00 AM

For the first 30 minutes or so, Passengers is a decent film. If you like Chris Pratt, you’ll probably raise that decent to a “good” or “interesting,” as the first section is essentially a solo act for one of America’s Favorite Chrises.

For the first 30 minutes or so, Passengers is a decent film. If you like Chris Pratt, you’ll probably raise that decent to a “good” or “interesting,” as the first section is essentially a solo act for one of America’s Favorite Chrises.

On the good ship Avalon, which soars through space on a century-long mission to another planet, 5,000 passengers pass the years in hibernation — until Pratt’s Jim Preston wakes up, 90 years too soon.