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Music

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM

Like the blossoms that have been emerging this spring, Oregon classical music is entering a period of renewal. 

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM

Salt Lake City’s Heartless Breakers play a brand of bombastic, overwrought rock ‘n’ roll popularized at the turn of the millennium — a style known as emo. 

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM

Sapient might just be the biggest rapper you’ve never heard of, which is a sad fact considering the Portland-based artist grew up here in Eugene. As one half of hip-hop duo Debaser, as well as a member of Sandpeople, he’s rubbed elbows with members of Hieroglyphics, Living Legends and Grayskul.

Savage Love

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM
April 16, 2015 01:00 AM
April 9, 2015 01:00 AM

Movies

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM

If 2013’s Frances Ha seemed a little nicer than writer-director Noah Baumbach’s usual fare — fewer pointed observations, more gentleness toward his characters, no matter how self-deluded — While We’re Young is a trip back to slightly rougher territory (though not quite as rough as Greenberg). Sly and self-aware, Baumbach is a deeply fair storyteller, giving his characters room to hang themselves and room to get their shit together all at once. 

Culture

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM

Sniffing out what you shouldn’t miss in the arts this week

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM

For the first time ever, the United States is sending a women’s team to the “touch rugby” world championships. UO club rugby player and Eugene resident Erika Farias is one of the women who will represent the nation at the Federation of International Touch’s 8th annual World Cup. 

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM

Let’s be real: At least 80 percent of the time, taking on a production of Les Misérables is a bad idea. “Ambitious” doesn’t begin to describe this excruciatingly melodramatic 1,500-page historical novel-turned-stage musical. 

April 23, 2015 01:00 AM

Sight Unseen is an Obie award-winning play by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Donald Margulies. The play, which opens this week at The Very Little Theatre, takes as its subject a renowned artist and strips him naked of all the trappings of success, leaving almost nothing where a man once was.