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Music

October 19, 2017 01:00 AM

In November 2016, Eugene post-rock band Gazelle(s) were in Joshua Tree, California tracking their debut LP, There’s No One New Around You, at Rancho de La Luna. The legendary recording studio owned by Dave Catching, a touring member of Eagles of Death Metal. Well-known acts like Queens of the Stone Age and PJ Harvey have recorded at Rancho de La Luna, and Gazelle(s) bassist Neal Williams calls the opportunity for his band to record there “a gift from Ninkasi.”

October 19, 2017 01:00 AM

Iron & Wine singer-songwriter Sam Beam is a breeze throughout the seasons. For more than a decade, his sound has wistfully danced through somber winters to the thawing afternoons of spring — at the core of his sound’s evolution lies the wind’s intrinsic trait: persistence.

October 19, 2017 01:00 AM

October closes with a plenitude of pianistic delights for classical music fans, beginning with Thursday’s Eugene Symphony concert at the Hult Center featuring the rising young pianist Conrad Tao.

October 19, 2017 01:00 AM

Thirty-two years ago next month, The Jesus and Mary Chain, a band created by Scottish songwriting brothers Jim and William Reid, released its debut album Psychocandy.

Savage Love

October 19, 2017 01:00 AM
October 12, 2017 01:00 AM
October 5, 2017 01:00 AM

Culture

October 19, 2017 01:00 AM

How do you present an antiquated, strictly traditional art form like ballet to an audience whose musical oldies are only 30 years old? Answer: fusion. That’s the M.O. at Ballet Fantastique.

October 19, 2017 01:00 AM

I’m a snob and a sniff and a two-bit dilettante of the lowest rank.

For instance, I once dismissed Stephen King as an immature populist hack whose middlebrow fiction is an affront to all things literary, and I felt that same way about playwright Neil Simon — a sentimental moron whose tweedy Borscht Belt shtick had transformed the grand tradition of romantic comedy into an efflorescence of twee and treacle.

Movies

October 19, 2017 01:00 AM

In Ambrose Bierce’s classic story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” a plantation owner in the Civil War is hanged from a bridge. Between the time he is pushed off and the moment he hits the bottom of the rope, the prisoner dreams of escape, hallucinating an elaborate story that ends, surprising the reader, when his neck snaps in the noose.